Tag Archive | Brain Health

Sweet As Sugar: Health Benefits Of Stevia And Xylitol

Sweet As Sugar: Health Benefits Of Stevia And Xylitol

By Robert Iafelice
***SEE REPOSTERS Note after References if sugar/carbs are causing deterioration in your health***

In 1991, reacting to an anonymous trade complaint, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) deemed the sweetener stevia unsafe and issued an Import Alert, banning all stevia from entering the United States.1-3 While the FDA cited inadequate toxicological evidence of its safety, the ban was not based on any consumer complaints or reported adverse effects.2

Extracts of the South American stevia plant, called steviol glycosides , are up to 300 times sweeter than sugar and have little aftertaste, zero calories, and no effect on blood sugar.3 At the time of the FDA ban, supporters of stevia argued without success that stevia, with its long history of food use, should qualify as having GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) status in the same manner as coffee, tea, sugar, fruit, etc. A history of safe use is one condition that must be met to qualify for GRAS, and this was actually acknowledged in the FDA’s Import Alert for stevia!4 The FDA not only banned a safe and natural sweetener in stevia, but one that appears to provide health benefits as well, most notably for regulating blood sugar and blood pressure.3,5

The controversial ban on the importation of stevia in the US continued until 1995 when the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 forced the FDA to allow stevia to be imported and marketed as a dietary supplement, but not as a sweetener or other food additive purpose.1 The FDA’s policy to classify stevia to be safe for consumption as a “supplement,” but potentially harmful as a sweetener just added to the controversy and confusion.

In 2008, after a rigorous review of the scientific evidence, the FDA granted stevia sweeteners GRAS status.6 It was also approved by the European Union in 2011.7

Today, hundreds of foods and beverages throughout the world are sweetened with stevia sweeteners. Among these are Vitamin Water®, Coke Zero®, Sprite Green®, Gatorade’s G2® and Crystal Light®. Coca-Cola® and Pepsi Cola® have both disclosed their intentions to use rebaudioside A, the sweetest stevia extract, as a zero-calorie soft-drink sweetener in the US.3

Stevia May Help Control Blood Sugar And Insulin Levels

Health Benefits

While stevia has been documented to have medical purposes as an antimicrobial, anti-diarrheal, anti-tumor, diuretic, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory actions, the scientific evidence is strongest, and its use is most promising for two indications: (1) high blood sugar/insulin resistance and (2) high blood pressure.3,5,8

Stevia May Help Control Blood Sugar And Insulin Levels

Extracts from stevia leaves have been used for centuries as a medicinal herb in the traditional treatment of diabetes in South America.5,9 Today, scientific evidence on stevia supports its historic precedent in the regulation of blood sugar and insulin.

Avoiding excess elevation of blood sugar and insulin after meals is perhaps the most important dietary measure you can take to reduce your risk for heart disease, cancer, and other age-related disorders. In a recent study in type II diabetic subjects, stevioside, one of the stevia extracts, reduced after-meal blood glucose levels by an average of 18%.10

When compared to sugar, stevia consumption before meals results in far lower after-meal glucose and insulin levels.11 Even when compared to aspartame, stevia resulted in lower post-prandial insulin levels.11 The comparison with aspartame is more impressive because the change in glucose and insulin levels cannot be due to a difference in calories, as with sugar. A key finding from this study was that participants eating stevia felt satisfied with fewer calories and did not eat more food throughout the day to compensate.11 This is an indication of stable blood sugar and insulin levels.

At the root of many cases of chronically elevated glucose and insulin levels is insulin resistance. In rats fed a fructose-rich diet for four weeks to induce insulin resistance, stevioside lowered high blood glucose levels in a dose-dependent manner and delayed the development of insulin resistance.12

Studies have evaluated the effects of stevioside on animal models of both type I and type II diabetes: elevated blood glucose levels were lowered, and less insulin medication was needed for the same effect. This research clearly demonstrates that stevia has the ability to increase cellular insulin sensitivity and help reverse insulin resistance.12,13

Interestingly, the mechanism for stevioside’s hypoglycemic effect in the latter group of rats with insulin dependent type I diabetes was determined to be slowing down gluconeogenesis (the synthesis of glucose in the liver from non-carbohydrate sources).13 Another plant compound very familiar to readers of Life Extension magazine®, chlorogenic acid from coffee beans, also down-regulates gluconeogenesis. Coffee sweetened with stevia may pack quite a one-two punch for blood sugar control!

The effect of stevia on blood sugar has only been observed when plasma glucose levels are elevated. It does not lower normal blood sugar levels in healthy individuals.5

Stevia is not just a safe sugar substitute, but a natural insulin sensitizer that may help maintain normal sugar and insulin levels in diabetics and nondiabetics alike. Since stevia extract also decreases oxidized LDL cholesterol14 and triglycerides,15 and lowers high blood pressure3,5—all metabolic risk factors—it has great potential for the treatment of metabolic syndrome.

Stevia May Lower Blood Pressure

A double-blind, placebo-controlled study demonstrated that oral stevioside taken at doses of 250 mg, three times a day for one year resulted in significant, lasting decreases in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure in patients with mild to moderate hypertension.16 A longer, subsequent study by the same research team that lasted two years and with an increased dose of stevioside ( 1,500 mg) replicated the decreases in blood pressure found in the initial study.17

The stevioside treatment was well-tolerated and no side effects were reported or detected. Moreover, the stevioside treatment group reported significantly higher quality of life scores than the placebo group.17 On the other hand, it was noted that more patients in the placebo group developed left ventricular hypertrophy,17 an abnormal thickening of the heart muscle often caused by high blood pressure.

Though the effect of stevioside was not better than drugs, it appears comparable and nearly everyone taking stevioside had significant lowering of blood pressure. As in the case of blood sugar, stevioside lowers elevated blood pressure, but not normal blood pressure.5

As a natural plant compound with no demonstrated side effects, stevia may offer an alternative or supplementary therapy for high blood pressure, and with possibly better compliance.

Xylitol: A Sweetener That’s Good For Your Teeth

Another sugar substitute with beneficial health properties that is growing in popularity is xylitol. While xylitol is a natural substance found in fruits and vegetables, it is also naturally produced in our bodies during normal carbohydrate metabolism. An average-size adult makes up to 15 grams of xylitol daily.18,19

Xylitol is classified as a sugar alcohol (like sorbitol, mannitol, erythritol, etc) because its chemical structure partially resembles sugar and partially resembles alcohol.20 It is actually a carbohydrate that looks and tastes remarkably like table sugar with 40% fewer calories and practically no aftertaste.21 It is used as a sweetener in chewing gums, mints, beverages, sweets, toothpaste and in tabletop granular form. It has been approved for use in foods, pharmaceuticals and oral health products in more than 35 countries worldwide, including the US.21

History Of Stevia

Stevia is a perennial shrub with over 200 species belonging to the Aster (sunflower) family and indigenous to South America.46 For centuries, the Guarani tribes of Paraguay and Brazil used the leaves of stevia, which they called ka’a he’e (“sweet herb”) to sweeten yerba mate tea and various foods. It was also used medicinally as a treatment for diabetes,47 hypertension, and obesity.5

Stevia has been used in Europe and Asia since the sixteenth century when it was discovered by the Spanish Conquistadors.48 The particular species used as a sweetener, Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni, was named after botanist Moises Santiago Bertoni, who “rediscovered” stevia and scientifically classified the plant in 1899, describing its sweet taste in detail. The compounds in the stevia leaf that give the plant its sweet taste, stevioside and rebaudioside A, were isolated in 1931 by French chemists.2

During World War II, England began to investigate stevia as an alternative to sugar, which was in short supply.49 In the 1970s, the Japanese began to use stevia to replace the banned artificial sweetener, saccharin. It became their chosen sugar alternative to sweeten food and beverages, so much so that Japan is now the largest consumer of stevia.2 Today, stevia can be found growing in China, South America, India, South Korea, Taiwan, and Israel, and is used in many countries around the globe.

Xylitol Fights Cavities

Though largely preventable, tooth decay (cavities) is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases among both adults and children, with 1 in 5 Americans reported to have untreated cavities according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).22 In 2010, roughly $108 billion dollars were spent on dental services in the US.23

By providing fuel for acid-forming bacteria in the mouth, sugar consumption sets up an ideal acidic condition that promotes decay and demineralization of teeth. Xylitol, conversely, is non-fermentable and does not feed acid-forming oral bacteria. Regular use of xylitol causes cavity-forming bacteria, most notably Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans ), to starve and die off by as much as 73%, decreasing the level of acidic byproducts formed when bacteria ferment sugars.24 Xylitol also increases salivary flow which helps to buffer these acids.25 A more alkaline environment is created, leading to less tooth decay and plaque, and enhanced tooth remineralization. Untreated cavities, especially small decay spots, can harden and become less sensitive from exposure to xylitol.26

Considerable research conducted since the early 1970s has established that consuming xylitol products results in reduction in tooth decay rates ranging from 30% up to levels in excess of 80%.27 What’s more, the protective effects of xylitol are long-lasting. In a study of nearly 300 children who chewed xylitol gum habitually for over two years and then stopped, some experienced a reduction in their tooth decay rate over the next five years.28 Xylitol-sweetened gum even reduces transmission of cavity-causing bacteria from mother to child.29

According to newer research, the number of exposures to xylitol throughout the day is more important than the quantity of xylitol.30 Consider chewing xylitol gum after each meal, sweetening your tea or coffee with xylitol granules and using xylitol toothpaste once or twice a day. Several dental associations, including the American Dental Association31 and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry,32 support the use of xylitol in caries control and prevention.

Xylitol Benefits Diabetes And Metabolic Syndrome

Because xylitol is slowly emptied from the stomach, and only about 50% of it is absorbed, it has neglible effects on blood sugar and insulin secretion.33,34 Xylitol has a considerably lower glycemic index (13) when compared with sucrose (65) and glucose (100).33 It even compares favorably with foods such as legumes and milk.35

In a recent animal study examining the antidiabetic potential of xylitol, animals fed xylitol had significantly better glucose tolerance (more stable blood sugar levels), less weight gain and significantly lower food intake (suppressed appetite) than both the sugar and control groups.36 Data from this study and others confirm that xylitol is an ideal low-calorie sweetener for people with diabetes, metabolic syndrome, obesity, and other metabolic disorders.34,36,37

Of course, like stevia, xylitol can be used by anyone to help maintain low blood sugar and insulin levels, thereby reducing risk of age-related disease.

Xylitol Helps Prevent Ear And Upper Respiratory Infections

Xyitol not only suppresses S. mutans, the cavity-promoting bacterium, but it also inhibits the growth of Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae), a major cause of middle ear infections and sinusitis.38,39 Owing to its unique structure, xylitol also has the ability to interfere with S. pneumoniae’s ability to stick to tissues and form colonies of bacteria called biofilms, making the germ more vulnerable to treatment.40

In clinical trials, xylitol given in the form of chewing gum or syrup reduced middle ear infections in daycare children by 30-40%.38,41,42 This safe and great-tasting sweetener offers the possibility of preventing ear infections in children and thus lessening the need for antibiotics.

Xylitol Strengthens Bone

Since xylitol appears to induce remineralization of tooth enamel, researchers are also now investigating its ability to remineralize bone tissue. Several animal studies show that xylitol increases bone density,43-45 suggesting that xylitol shows promise in the treatment or prevention of osteoporosis. Clinical trials are needed to confirm these potential benefits.

Summary

Stevia and xylitol are not only safe and tasty sugar alternatives, but also potent natural compounds that provide multiple health benefits.3,5,8,27,34,36-38,43-45 While both sweeteners improve glucose tolerance and reduce insulin needs, stevia can also lower elevated blood pressure while xylitol can help prevent cavities and ear infections, and possibly strengthen bones.3,5,8,27,34,36-38,43-45

Add some stevia to your favorite beverage and chew xylitol gum after meals. Enjoy the sweet taste and gain important health dividends as well.

If you have any questions on the scientific content of this article, please call a Life Extension® Health Advisor at 1-866-864-3027.

References

  1. Available at: http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/cms_ia/importalert_119.html. Accessed October 27, 2013.
  2. Available at: http://www.ianrpubs.unl.edu/epublic/pages/publicationD.jsp?publicationId=609. AccessedOctober 27, 2013.
  3. Ulbricht C, Isaac R, Milkin, et al. An evidence-based systematic review of stevia by the Natural Standard Research Collaboration. Cardiovasc Hematol Agents Med Chem. 2010;8(2):113–27.
  4. Available at: http://owndoc.com/pdf/Stevia.pdf. Accessed October 19 , 2013.
  5. Chatsudthipong V, Muanprasat C. Stevioside and related compounds: therapeutic benefits beyond sweetness. Pharmaco Ther. 2009;121(1):41-54.
  6. Available at: http://www.fda.gov/food/ingredientspackaginglabeling/gras/noticeinventory/ucm171539.htm. Accessed October 21, 2013.
  7. Available at: http://eurlex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2011:295:0205:0211:EN:PDF. Accessed October 22, 2013.
  8. Goyal SK, Samsher, Goyal RK. Stevia (Stevia rebaudiana) a bio-sweetener: a review. Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2010 Feb;61(1):1-10.
  9. Available at: http://healthfree.com/stevlife.html. Accessed October 30 , 2013.
  10. Gregersen S, Jeppesen PB, Holst J. Antihyperglycemic effects of stevioside in type 2 diabetic subjects. Metabolism. 2004;53(1):73-6.
  11. Anton SD, Martin CK, Han H, et al. Effects of stevia, aspartame, and sucrose on food intake, satiety, and postprandial glucose and insulin levels. Appetite. 2010;55(1):37–43.
  12. Chang JC, Wu MC, Liu IM, et al. Increase of insulin sensitivity by stevioside in fructose-rich chow-fed rats. Horm Metab Res. 2005;37(10):610-6.
  13. Chen TH, Chen SC, Chan P, et al. Mechanism of the hypoglycemic effect of stevioside, a glycoside of Stevia rebaudiana. Planta Med. 2005;71(2):108-13.
  14. Geeraert B, Crombe F, Hulsmans M, et al. Stevioside inhibits atherosclerosis by improving insulin signaling and antioxidant defense in obese insulin-resistant mice. Int J Obes (Lond). 2010 Mar;34(3):569-77.
  15. Park JE, Cha YS. Stevia rebaudianaBertoni extract supplementation improves lipid and carnitine profiles in C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat diet. J Sci Food Agric. 2010 May;90(7):1099-105.
  16. Chan P, Tomlinson B, Chen YJ, et al. A double-blind placebo-controlled study of the effectiveness and tolerability of oral stevioside in human hypertension. Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2000;50(3):215-20.
  17. Hsieh MH, Chan P, Sue Y.M, et al.Efficacy and tolerability of oral stevioside in patients with mild essential hypertension, a two-year, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Clin Ther. 2003;25(11):2797-808.
  18. Available at: http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-996-XYLITOL.aspx?activeIngredientId=996&activeIngredientName=XYLITOL. Accessed November 21, 2013.
  19. Available at: http://www.xylitol.org/questions-about-xylitol. AccessedNovember 21, 2013.
  20. Natah SS, Hussien KR, et al. Metabolic response to lactitol and xylitol in healthy men. Am J Clin Nutr. 1997;65:947-50.
  21. Available at: http://www.caloriecontrol.org/sweeteners-and-lite/polyols/xylitol. Accessed October 30, 2013.
  22. Available at: http://health.usnews.com/health-news/news/articles/2012/05/31/1-in-5-americans-has-untreated-cavities-cdc. Accessed October 29, 2013.
  23. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/publications/aag/doh.htm. Accessed October 29, 2013.
  24. Bahador A, Lesan S, Kashi N. Effect of xylitol on cariogenic and beneficial oral streptococci: a randomized, double-blind crossover trial. Iran J Microbiol. 2012 Jun;4(2):75-81.
  25. Soderling E. Controversies around xylitol. Eur J Dent. 2009 April 3(2):81-2.
  26. Mäkinen KK, Mäkinen PL, Pape HR Jr, et al. Stabilisation of rampant caries: polyol gums and arrest of dentine caries in two long-term cohort studies in young subjects. Int Dent J. 1995 Feb;45(1 Suppl 1):93-107.
  27. Makinen KK. The rocky road of xylitol to its clinical application. J Dent Res. 2000 Jun; 79(6):1352-5.
  28. Hujoel PP, Makinen KK, Bennett CA, et al. The optimum time to initiate habitual xylitol gum-chewing for obtaining long-term caries prevention. J Dent Res. 1999;78(3):797-803.
  29. Isokangas P, Soderling E, Pienihakkinen K, et al. Occurrence of dental decay in children after maternal consumption of xylitol chewing gum, a follow-up from 0 to5 years of age. J Dent Res. 2000 Nov;79(11):1885-9.
  30. Milgrom P, Ly KA, Roberts MC, et al. Mutans streptococci dose response to xylitol chewing gum. J Dent Res. 2006 Feb;85(2):177-81.
  31. Available at: http://www.ada.org/6206.aspx. Accessed October 30, 2013.
  32. Available at: http://www.aapd.org/media/Policies_Guidelines/P_Xylitol.pdf.Accessed October 30 , 2013.
  33. Livesey G. Health potential of polyols as sugar replacers, with emphasis on low glycaemic properties. Nutr Res Rev. 2003 Dec;16(2):163-91.
  34. Salminen S, Salminen E, Marks V. The effects of xylitol on the secretion of insulin and gastric inhibitory polypeptide in man and rats. Diabetologia. 1982;22(6):480-2.
  35. Available at: http://www.xylitol.org/xylitol-nutritional-info-professional.Accessed October 31 , 2013.
  36. Islam MS. Effects of xylitol as a sugar substitute on diabetes-related parameters in nondiabetic rats. J Med Foods. 2011 May;14(5):505-11.
  37. Hassinger W, Sauer G, Cordes U, et al. The effects of equal caloric amounts of xylitol, sucrose and starch on insulin requirements and blood glucose levels in insulin-dependent diabetics. Diabetologia. 1981;21:37-40.
  38. Uhari M, Tapiainen T, Kontiokari T. Xylitol in preventing acute otitis media. Vaccine. 2000;19:S144-7.
  39. McEllistrem MC, Adams J, Mason EO, Wald ER. Epidemiology of acute otitis media caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae before and after licensure of the 7-valent pneumococcal protein conjugate vaccine. J Infect Dis. 2003 Dec 1;188(11):1679-84.
  40. Available at: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/eccmid20/abstract.asp?id=84998. Accessed November 21, 2013.
  41. Uhari M, Kontiokari T, Koskela M, et al. Xylitol chewing gum in prevention of acute otitis media: double blind randomized trial. Br Med J. 1996;313:1180–3.
  42. Uhari M, Kontiokari T, Niemela M. A novel use of xylitol sugar in preventing acute otitis media. Pediatrics. 1998;102:879–84.
  43. Sato H, Ide Y, Nasu M, et al. The effects of oral xylitol administration on bone density in rat femur. Odontology. 2011 Jan;99(1):28-33.
  44. Mattila PT, Svanberg MJ, Pokka P, et al. Dietary xylitol protects against weakening of bone biomechanical properties in ovariectomized rats . J Nutr. 1998 Oct;128(10):1811-4.
  45. Mattila PT, Svanberg MJ, Knuuttila ML. Increased bone volume and bone mineral content in xylitol-fed aged rats. Gerontology. 2001 Nov-Dec;47(6):300-5.
  46. Available at: http://www.parc.gov.pk/articles/sugar_leaf.htm. AccessedNovember 22, 2013,
  47. Abudula R, Jeppesen PB, Rolfsen SE, et al. Rebaudioside A potently stimulates insulin secretion from isolated mouse islets: studies on the dose-, glucose-, and calcium-dependency. Metabolism. 2004 Oct;53(10):1378-81.
  48. Available at: http://www.holisticmed.com/sweet/stv-faq.txt. Accessed October 28, 2013.
  49. Available at: http://www.uofmhealth.org/health-library/hn-2169001#hn-2169001-uses. Accessed October 27, 2013.

*****REPOSTER’S NOTE

Thank You to  Life Extension Magazine February 2014    for this article – Well Done

Dietary Intake of  refined sugars and starches has increased dramatically during a time when physical activity has reduced significantly. We are seeing the North American population in particular.

This in combination with other lifestyle changes over the past 100 years of progress is leading to an overall reduction in health and wellness. Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, Cardiovascular and Cardiopulmonary Disease are now very common detractors to what should be more enjoyable lifestyles.

Our societal sweet tooth is doing more to shorten lifespans and quality of life than anyone could have anticipated 100 years ago. Natural substances such as Stevia, Xylitol and Monk Fruit are gaining popularity as healthy natural sugar replacements.

They are a step in the right direction. Real progress will need us to move away from our high calorie, sedentary, sleep deprived  behaviors we as a majority are currently engaged in.

To combat the effects of the typical North American Lifestyle, we have chosen to add a nutritional supplement to our daily routine that employs Stevia, Xylitol and Monk fruit.  On  their own they provide healthy benefits but when combined with other needed and beneficial nutrients They Can Literally Save  Lives. Consistent use reverses damage caused by the typical North American lifestyle.

Take a look at this link only if you are interested actively pursuing a path to better health. It just requires a few moments a day consistently. This solution is just one part of the equation for far better health and wellness but to us, a very important one. So important that I chose to become a sales rep so I could help friends and family.

Should you decide that this is also for you, my name is Deb St Jean and my ID number is 1309426. Please contact me through comments for consumption guidelines.

You don’t have to be perfect to be healthy – and you don’t have to be deprived. A few good choices can change every outcome.
Advertisements

101 Uses for Coconut Oil – A True, Whole Body-Mind Anti-Aging Solution & Skin Rejuvenator

101 Uses for Coconut Oil

****Reposters Note – Thank you to for this excellent post, 101 Uses for Coconut Oil.

Coconut Oil is one of those choices that is sure to benefit everyone who chooses to add it to their diets. Coincidentally,  it is as good for us externally as internally. Add to that, it is an  excellent all natural tool for all sorts of little jobs around the home. It is truly astonishing how many (not so natural) products it can replace in your cupboard, medicine cabinets and around the home.

Our local Costco carries an excellent Organic Cold Pressed Virgin Coconut Oil 1.5 kg (54 oz) for around $16.00.***

Coconut 101 Uses for Coconut Oil

I’ve said before that I am with coconut oil like the dad in “My Big Fat Greek Wedding” is with windex… I use it for everything. Right now, I have a five gallon bucket of it sitting next to my desk because we use so much and I don’t have anywhere else to keep it…

Today, I’m sharing my top 101 (yes 101!!) uses for coconut oil:

Uses for Coconut Oil

  1. In cooking as a great oil with a high smoke point. Great for baking, stir-frys or as a dairy free replacement to butter.
  2. Taken supplementally for daily energy
  3. As a coffee creamer when emulsified into coffee (The only way I’ll drink coffee)
  4. On the skin as a basic lotion
  5. In homemade lotion bars for soft, smooth skin
  6. In homemade deodorant or deodorant bars
  7. As an eye-makeup remover
  8. As a cloth diaper safe diaper cream (just rub on baby’s bottom)
  9. In making your own Remineralizing Toothpaste
  10. To lighten age spots when rubbed directly on the skin
  11. To prevent stretch marks during pregnancy
  12. To support healthy thyroid function
  13. In homemade Mayo without the high PUFA vegetable oils
  14. To help increase sun tolerance and avoid burning
  15. As a naturally SPF 4 sunscreen
  16. In homemade lotion recipes
  17. To get rid of cradle cap on baby- just massage in to head, leave on for a few minutes and gently rinse with a warm wash cloth
  18. Topically to kill yeast or yeast infections
  19. As a delicious tropical massage oil
  20. It’s high Lauric acid and MCFA content helps boost metaboism
  21. A tiny dab rubbed on your hands and then through hair will help get rid of friz
  22. As an intensive nighttime facial moisturizer
  23. Mixed with equal parts sugar for a smoothing body scrub (use in the shower)
  24. Rubbed on lips as a natural chap stick
  25. Topically, can help skin heal faster after injury or infection
  26. Directly on the perineum to help heal after birth
  27. As an incredibly intensive natural conditioner- Rub into dry hair, put a shower cap on and leave for several hours
  28. On feet to fight athlete’s foot or tor fungus
  29. In place of Lanolin cream on nursing nipples to sooth irritation (also great for baby!)
  30. Can help sooth psoriasis or eczema
  31. There is some evidence that regular ingestion of coconut oil can help prevent or reverse Alzheimers
  32.  With apple cider vinegar as a natural treatment for lice that actually works
  33. In natural Homemade Sunscreen
  34. In healthy brain boosting snack for kids like Coconut Clusters
  35. In a filling and energy boosting Brain Powder Smoothie
  36. Rub coconut oil on the inside of your nose to help alleviate allergy symptoms
  37. Nursing moms can take 3-4 tablespoons a day (and Vitamin D) to increase milk supply and nutrients
  38. There is some evidence that coconut oil helps digestion and may even kill intestinal parasites or yeast
  39. Mix a tablespoon with a tablespoon of chia seeds for an all-day energy boost (do NOT take this at night!)
  40. Can help improve insulin levels
  41. Oil pulling with coconut oil and a drop of oregano oil helps improve gum health
  42. Can help improve cholesterol ratios
  43. Blend a tablespoon into hot tea to help speed recovery from cold or flu
  44. In Homemade Natural Bug-Off Lotion Bars
  45. As a replacement for vegetable oils in any recipe
  46. Better for high-temperature cooking than olive or vegetable oils
  47. Can help reduce appearance of varicose veins
  48. After initial heat is gone, can help speed healing of sunburn
  49. Is an immediate source of energy when eaten and isn’t stored as fat
  50. As a natural personal lubricant that won’t disturb vaginal flora
  51. As a naturally antibacterial skin cream
  52. In natural homemade diaper cream
  53. As a natural shave cream and after shave lotion
  54. When used consistently on skin it can help get rid of cellulite
  55. To season cast iron skillets
  56. It’s anti-inflammatory properties can help lessen arthritis
  57. Can reduce the itch of mosquito bites
  58. Can help resolve acne when used regularly
  59. Can be rubbed into scalp daily to stimulate hair growth
  60. I’ve used in kids ears to help speed ear infection healing
  61. On split ends to de-frizz
  62. A small amount can be rubbed into real leather to soften and condition (shiny leather only… test a small area first)
  63. By itself as a great tanning oil
  64. Mixed with salt to remove dry skin on feet
  65. Can help speed weight loss when consumed daily
  66. Can help improve sleep when taken daily
  67. Can be used to speed healing of fungal infections when taken internally and used externally
  68. A tablespoon melted into a cup of warm tea can help sooth a sore throat
  69. To help sooth the itch of chicken pox or poison ivy
  70. It has been shown to increase absorption of calcium and magnesium
  71. Internally as part of the protocol to help remineralize teeth
  72.  Some evidence shows that the beneficial fats in coconut oil can help with depression and anxiety
  73. By itself as a natural deodorant
  74. By itself or with baking soda as a naturally whitening toothpaste
  75. For pets struggling with skin issues when used externally
  76. Some evidence suggests that the beneficial fats in coconut oil are helpful for those with Autism
  77. In homemade vapor rub
  78. As a safe cooking oil for deep frying
  79. A tablespoon taken before each meal can help improve digestion
  80. Can be taken in warm ginger tea to sooth heartburn or nausea
  81. As a completely natural baby lotion
  82. On hands after doing dishes to avoid dry skin
  83. Mixed with catnip, rosemary, or mint essential oils as a natural bug repellent
  84. Can be used on mom’s nipple and baby’s mouth to help treat thrush
  85. Many use it as an anti-aging facial moisturizer
  86. Use to make coconut cream concentrate for a brain boosting snack
  87. Can be used internally and externally to speed recovery from UTIs
  88. When taken regularly, it can help fight candida
  89. When taken regularly, it can boost hormone production
  90. Can relieve the pain of hemorrhoids when used topically
  91. Can boost circulation and help those who often feel cold
  92. On cuticles to help nails grow
  93. Rub into elbows daily to help alleviate dry, flaky elbows
  94. Add to smoothies to give them a nutritional boost
  95. Internally during pregnancy to help provide baby necessary fats for development (especially when taken with Fermented Cod Liver Oil)
  96. In any recipes where vegetable oils are used
  97. Whipped with shea butter for a soothing body balm
  98. One reader swears by using coconut oil to treat yeast infection. She suggests soaking a tampon in it and inserting the tampon for a few hours.
  99. Naturally clears up cold sores
  100. Ingesting coconut oil daily can help with allergy symptoms
  101. Ingesting coconut oil daily can increase mental alertness
You can also check out my recipe index or Start Here Page for many more recipes that use coconut oil!

 What Kind of Coconut Oil?

For external uses, expeller pressed or other types of refined coconut oil will work, but for internal use, an unrefined virgin coconut oil is best. My husband and I both take about 4 tablespoons a day and the kids get a couple tablespoons in food, smoothies, or hot herbal tea.

***REPOSTERS NOTE

Links to other  Coconut Oil posts from All About Wellness Solutions – A cornucopia of varied information

Coconut Oil Pulling Therapy – Excellent Detox & Wellness Rejuvenator

Homemade Toothpaste With Coconut Oil – Health & Heart Smart

Get Off Your Thyroid Medication And Start Consuming Coconut Oil

Why You Should Use COCONUT OIL – 9 Benefits For Skin, Body And Soul

10 health Benefits of Virgin Coconut Oil

80 Awesome Uses For COCONUT OIL, In Your Home and Your Health

13 Evidence-Based Medicinal Properties of Coconut Oil

10 health Benefits of Virgin Coconut Oil

Finally pretty much everybody is on the Coconut Oil bandwagon.

It is so good for you.

It can replace so many commercially produced and modified fats in our diets.

It truly helps the body function better and leads to better health in every area.

I love cooking with it as it handles heat very well. It adds a creaminess flavor-wise but very little is absorbed into the foods cooked in it.  It adds a golden brown finish to fried veggies like mushrooms without burning them. It does not interfere with the flavor of foods any more than butter does.

It is the perfect Stir-Fry Oil as a little goes a long way.

I love to have Coconut & G rapeseed Oil as well as natural Butter in my kitchen for cooking.

I love to have Coconut Oil in my home for all of its other uses. My favorite is adding 1/4 teaspoon in my bath for the last few minutes as it is a great skin softener and is very nourishing for the hair.

For a bigger picture of Coconut Oil, please take a look at some of my previous blogs on this topic.

Thanks to Positive Med for finding this great poster.

5 Things You Can Do To Protect Yourself From Alzheimers

5 Things You Can Do To Protect Yourself From Alzheimers

 

People are often told that there is very little that can be done to prevent Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia. A recent study has results to show that those with greater life purpose and some specific nutrition approaches can result in the maintenance of better cognitive ability.

By: PF Louis, NaturalNews.com

(NaturalNews) A study led by Dr. Patricia Boyle of Rush University Center in Chicago has concluded that people with greater life purpose maintained cognitive ability better than those who weren’t leading a purposeful life.

Dr. Boyle and her team wanted to establish a strategy for avoiding Alzheimer’s consequences rather than attempting to find a way of keeping brain plaques and tangles from accumulating.

After following 246 senior citizens — with up to ten years of annual cognitive exams and neurological testing — and quizzing them about life missions and then doing brain autopsies after their deaths, they reached a conclusion.

1 Life purpose/activity

As people age, they’re prone to getting brain plaques and tangles. But if they have a life purpose zestfully pursued, they avoid dementia despite those physical impairments.

There are many real life examples of people managing well as they keenly continue to pursue their life adventures, especially adventures that require mental focus and activity.

Many experts also agree that engaging in mental activities which are new or challenging as one ages also helps retain mental acuity. Walking briskly in nature a mile or so four days a week also helps maintain one’s cognitive abilities.

Four specific nutritional approaches

2 Coconut Oil

After failing to get her dementia addled husband into an Alzheimer drug trial because they were no longer accepting volunteers, Dr. Mary Newport discovered the active ingredient in the formula tested was a synthetic medium chain triglyceride(MCT).

Getting patent rights for big bucks requires the creation of synthetic drugs. Synthetic drugs always produce side effects and their PR exceeds their efficacy.

Dr. Newport discovered that coconut oil contained natural MCT. Her husband had entered the darker side of dementia with his late stage Alzheimer’s. Yet after around a month and a half he was almost completely recovered after taking a tablespoon of coconut oil twice daily. Metabolizing MCTs produces ketones, which dissolve brain plaques and tangles.

An Australian shared his escape from early stage Alzheimer’s on YouTube using both coconut oil and niacin (B3), a supplement pioneered in orthomolecular psychiatry for many mental issues.

3 Vitamin D3 and Curcumin:

The synergy of combining curcumin with vitamin D3 to prevent or reverse Alzheimer’s is a recent development. Each substance alone has shown efficacy on dementia, so why wouldn’t combining the two create a powerful synergy?

This has been recently proven to be effective without side effects.

4 Eliminate aluminum

Avoid aluminum cooking utensils and underarm deodorants containing aluminum. Vaccines contain aluminum that goes right into your bloodstream. Aluminum bypasses the blood brain barrier and accumulates in soft tissue cells that regenerate less often than other tissues, creating plaque.

The brain is an organ that is made of cells that recycle more slowly than most other organ tissue cells. Silica is ideal for removing aluminum from soft tissue and eliminating through the urine. The herb horsetail contains a lot of silica and can be made into a tincture to provide constant silica dosing.

There are also supplements and mineral waters sold commercially that are high in silica.

5 Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA)

Alpha lipoic acid has demonstrated stopping the progression of dementia from early stage into late stage Alzheimer’s with a daily 600 mg dose.

ALA’s oxidative ability is coupled, reducing brain inflammation along with the some metal chelating activity for heavy metals, including lead and mercury.

Dietary advice includes reducing fructose of all types and eliminating processed simple carbs. Brain cells are cholesterol based. Reducing fats for any reason is not a good idea.

Thank You to John and his crew at Optimum Health in Edmonton & Sherwood Park for posting this Natural News Article.
Source: http://www.naturalnews.com/035983_Alzheimers_prevention_coconut_oil.html