Tag Archive | Exercise

10 Simple Things You Can Do Today That Will Make You Happier Science Proves

10 Simple Things You Can Do Today That Will Make You Happier Science Proves

***Reposters Note*** Thank You to riseearth.com and bufferapp.com for the information in this post. Happiness is something most of us would choose more of in our lives. Here are some ways to make that choice more of a reality in your life experience. Enjoy.***

Happiness is so interesting, because we all have different ideas about what it is and how to get it.

I would love to be happier, as I’m sure most people would, so I thought it would be interesting to find some ways to become a happier person that are actually backed up by science. Here are ten of the best ones I found.

1. Exercise more – 7 minutes might be enough

You might have seen some talk recently about the scientific 7 minute workout mentioned in The New York Times. So if you thought exercise was something you didn’t have time for, maybe you can fit it in after all.

happiness Exercise has such a profound effect on our happiness and well-being that it’s actually been proven to be an effective strategy for overcoming depression. In a study cited in Shawn Achor’s book, The Happiness Advantage, three groups of patients treated their depression with either medication, exercise, or a combination of the two. The results of this study really surprised me. Although all three groups experienced similar improvements in their happiness levels to begin with, the follow up assessments proved to be radically different:

The groups were then tested six months later to assess their relapse rate. Of those who had taken the medication alone, 38 percent had slipped back into depression. Those in the combination group were doing only slightly better, with a 31 percent relapse rate. The biggest shock, though, came from the exercise group: Their relapse rate was only 9 percent!

You don’t have to be depressed to gain benefit from exercise, though. It can help you to relax, increase your brain power and even improve your body image, even if you don’t lose any weight.

A study in the Journal of Health Psychology found that people who exercised felt better about their bodies, even when they saw no physical changes:

Body weight, shape and body image were assessed in 16 males and 18 females before and after both 6 × 40 mins exercise and 6 × 40 mins reading. Over both conditions, body weight and shape did not change. Various aspects of body image, however, improved after exercise compared to before.

We’ve explored exercise in depth before, and looked at what it does to our brains, such as releasing proteins and endorphins that make us feel happier, as you can see in the image below.

brain

2. Sleep more – you’ll be less sensitive to negative emotions

We know that sleep helps our bodies to recover from the day and repair themselves, and that it helps us focus and be more productive. It turns out, it’s also important for our happiness.

In NutureShock, Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman explain how sleep affects our positivity:

Negative stimuli get processed by the amygdala; positive or neutral memories gets processed by the hippocampus. Sleep deprivation hits the hippocampus harder than the amygdala. The result is that sleep-deprived people fail to recall pleasant memories, yet recall gloomy memories just fine.

In one experiment by Walker, sleep-deprived college students tried to memorize a list of words. They could remember 81% of the words with a negative connotation, like “cancer.” But they could remember only 31% of the words with a positive or neutral connotation, like “sunshine” or “basket.”

The BPS Research Digest explores another study that proves sleep affects our sensitivity to negative emotions. Using a facial recognition task over the course of a day, the researchers studied how sensitive participants were to positive and negative emotions. Those who worked through the afternoon without taking a nap became more sensitive late in the day to negative emotions like fear and anger.

Using a face recognition task, here we demonstrate an amplified reactivity to anger and fear emotions across the day, without sleep. However, an intervening nap blocked and even reversed this negative emotional reactivity to anger and fear while conversely enhancing ratings of positive (happy) expressions.

Of course, how well (and how long) you sleep will probably affect how you feel when you wake up, which can make a difference to your whole day. Especially this graph showing how your brain activity decreases is a great insight about how important enough sleep is for productivity and happiness:

sleep

Another study tested how employees’ moods when they started work in the morning affected their work day.

Researchers found that employees’ moods when they clocked in tended to affect how they felt the rest of the day. Early mood was linked to their perceptions of customers and to how they reacted to customers’ moods.

And most importantly to managers, employee mood had a clear impact on performance, including both how much work employees did and how well they did it.

Sleep is another topic we’ve looked into before, exploring how much sleep we really need to be productive.

3. Move closer to work – a short commute is worth more than a big house

Our commute to the office can have a surprisingly powerful impact on our happiness. The fact that we tend to do this twice a day, five days a week, makes it unsurprising that its effect would build up over time and make us less and less happy.

According to The Art of Manliness, having a long commute is something we often fail to realize will affect us so dramatically:

… while many voluntary conditions don’t affect our happiness in the long term because we acclimate to them, people never get accustomed to their daily slog to work because sometimes the traffic is awful and sometimes it’s not. Or as Harvard psychologist Daniel Gilbert put it, “Driving in traffic is a different kind of hell every day.”

We tend to try to compensate for this by having a bigger house or a better job, but these compensations just don’t work:

Two Swiss economists who studied the effect of commuting on happiness found that such factors could not make up for the misery created by a long commute.

4. Spend time with friends and family – don’t regret it on your deathbed

Staying in touch with friends and family is one of the top five regrets of the dying. If you want more evidence that it’s beneficial for you, I’ve found some research that proves it can make you happier right now.

Social time is highly valuable when it comes to improving our happiness, even for introverts. Several studies have found that time spent with friends and family makes a big difference to how happy we feel, generally.

I love the way Harvard happiness expert Daniel Gilbert explains it:

We are happy when we have family, we are happy when we have friends and almost all the other things we think make us happy are actually just ways of getting more family and friends.

George Vaillant is the director of a 72-year study of the lives of 268 men.

In an interview in the March 2008 newsletter to the Grant Study subjects, Vaillant was asked, “What have you learned from the Grant Study men?” Vaillant’s response: “That the only thing that really matters in life are your relationships to other people.”

He shared insights of the study with Joshua Wolf Shenk at The Atlantic on how the men’s social connections made a difference to their overall happiness:

The men’s relationships at age 47, he found, predicted late-life adjustment better than any other variable, except defenses. Good sibling relationships seem especially powerful: 93 percent of the men who were thriving at age 65 had been close to a brother or sister when younger.

In fact, a study published in the Journal of Socio-Economics states than your relationships are worth more than $100,000:

Using the British Household Panel Survey, I find that an increase in the level of social involvements is worth up to an extra £85,000 a year in terms of life satisfaction. Actual changes in income, on the other hand, buy very little happiness.

I think that last line is especially fascinating: Actual changes in income, on the other hand, buy very little happiness. So we could increase our annual income by hundreds of thousands of dollars and still not be as happy as if we increased the strength of our social relationships.

The Terman study, which is covered in The Longevity Project, found that relationships and how we help others were important factors in living long, happy lives:

We figured that if a Terman participant sincerely felt that he or she had friends and relatives to count on when having a hard time then that person would be healthier. Those who felt very loved and cared for, we predicted, would live the longest.

Surprise: our prediction was wrong… Beyond social network size, the clearest benefit of social relationships came from helping others. Those who helped their friends and neighbors, advising and caring for others, tended to live to old age.

5. Go outside – happiness is maximized at 13.9°C

In The Happiness Advantage, Shawn Achor recommends spending time in the fresh air to improve your happiness:

Making time to go outside on a nice day also delivers a huge advantage; one study found that spending 20 minutes outside in good weather not only boosted positive mood, but broadened thinking and improved working memory…

This is pretty good news for those of us who are worried about fitting new habits into our already-busy schedules. Twenty minutes is a short enough time to spend outside that you could fit it into your commute or even your lunch break.

A UK study from the University of Sussex also found that being outdoors made people happier:

Being outdoors, near the sea, on a warm, sunny weekend afternoon is the perfect spot for most. In fact, participants were found to be substantially happier outdoors in all natural environments than they were in urban environments.

The American Meteorological Society published research in 2011 that found current temperature has a bigger effect on our happiness than variables like wind speed and humidity, or even the average temperature over the course of a day. It also found that happiness is maximized at 13.9°C, so keep an eye on the weather forecast before heading outside for your 20 minutes of fresh air.

6. Help others – 100 hours a year is the magical number

One of the most counterintuitive pieces of advice I found is that to make yourself feel happier, you should help others. In fact, 100 hours per year (or two hours per week) is the optimal time we should dedicate to helping others in order to enrich our lives.

If we go back to Shawn Achor’s book again, he says this about helping others:

…when researchers interviewed more than 150 people about their recent purchases, they found that money spent on activities—such as concerts and group dinners out—brought far more pleasure than material purchases like shoes, televisions, or expensive watches. Spending money on other people, called “prosocial spending,” also boosts happiness.

The Journal of Happiness Studies published a study that explored this very topic:

Participants recalled a previous purchase made for either themselves or someone else and then reported their happiness. Afterward, participants chose whether to spend a monetary windfall on themselves or someone else. Participants assigned to recall a purchase made for someone else reported feeling significantly happier immediately after this recollection; most importantly, the happier participants felt, the more likely they were to choose to spend a windfall on someone else in the near future.

So spending money on other people makes us happier than buying stuff for ourselves. What about spending our time on other people? A study of volunteering in Germany explored how volunteers were affected when their opportunities to help others were taken away:

Shortly after the fall of the Berlin Wall but before the German reunion, the first wave of data of the GSOEP was collected in East Germany. Volunteering was still widespread. Due to the shock of the reunion, a large portion of the infrastructure of volunteering (e.g. sports clubs associated with firms) collapsed and people randomly lost their opportunities for volunteering. Based on a comparison of the change in subjective well-being of these people and of people from the control group who had no change in their volunteer status, the hypothesis is supported that volunteering is rewarding in terms of higher life satisfaction.

In his book Flourish: A Visionary New Understanding of Happiness and Well-being, University of Pennsylvania professor Martin Seligman explains that helping others can improve our own lives:

…we scientists have found that doing a kindness produces the single most reliable momentary increase in well-being of any exercise we have tested.

7. Practice smiling – it can alleviate pain

Smiling itself can make us feel better, but it’s more effective when we back it up with positive thoughts, according to this study:

A new study led by a Michigan State University business scholar suggests customer-service workers who fake smile throughout the day worsen their mood and withdraw from work, affecting productivity. But workers who smile as a result of cultivating positive thoughts – such as a tropical vacation or a child’s recital – improve their mood and withdraw less.

Of course it’s important to practice “real smiles” where you use your eye sockets. It’s very easy to spot the difference:

pic1

According to PsyBlog, smiling can improve our attention and help us perform better on cognitive tasks:

Smiling makes us feel good which also increases our attentional flexibility and our ability to think holistically. When this idea was tested by Johnson et al. (2010), the results showed that participants who smiled performed better on attentional tasks which required seeing the whole forest rather than just the trees.

A smile is also a good way to alleviate some of the pain we feel in troubling circumstances:

Smiling is one way to reduce the distress caused by an upsetting situation. Psychologists call this the facial feedback hypothesis. Even forcing a smile when we don’t feel like it is enough to lift our mood slightly (this is one example of embodied cognition).

One of our previous posts goes into even more detail about the science of smiling.

8. Plan a trip – but don’t take one

As opposed to actually taking a holiday, it seems that planning a vacation or just a break from work can improve our happiness. A study published in the journal, Applied Research in Quality of Life showed that the highest spike in happiness came during the planning stage of a vacation as employees enjoyed the sense of anticipation:

In the study, the effect of vacation anticipation boosted happiness for eight weeks.

After the vacation, happiness quickly dropped back to baseline levels for most people.

Shawn Achor has some info for us on this point, as well:

One study found that people who just thought about watching their favorite movie actually raised their endorphin levels by 27 percent.

If you can’t take the time for a vacation right now, or even a night out with friends, put something on the calendar—even if it’s a month or a year down the road. Then whenever you need a boost of happiness, remind yourself about it.

9. Meditate – rewire your brain for happiness

Meditation is often touted as an important habit for improving focus, clarity and attention span, as well as helping to keep you calm. It turns out it’s also useful for improving your happiness:

In one study, a research team from Massachusetts General Hospital looked at the brain scans of 16 people before and after they participated in an eight-week course in mindfulness meditation. The study, published in the January issue of Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, concluded that after completing the course, parts of the participants’ brains associated with compassion and self-awareness grew, and parts associated with stress shrank.

Meditation literally clears your mind and calms you down, it’s been often proven to be the single most effective way to live a happier live. I believe that this graphic explains it the best:

calming-mind-brain-waves

According to Shawn Achor, meditation can actually make you happier long-term:

Studies show that in the minutes right after meditating, we experience feelings of calm and contentment, as well as heightened awareness and empathy. And, research even shows that regular meditation can permanently rewire the brain to raise levels of happiness.

The fact that we can actually alter our brain structure through mediation is most surprising to me and somewhat reassuring that however we feel and think today isn’t permanent.

10. Practice gratitude – increase both happiness and life satisfaction

This is a seemingly simple strategy, but I’ve personally found it to make a huge difference to my outlook. There are lots of ways to practice gratitude, from keeping a journal of things you’re grateful for, sharing three good things that happen each day with a friend or your partner, and going out of your way to show gratitude when others help you.

In an experiment where some participants took note of things they were grateful for each day, their moods were improved just from this simple practice:

The gratitude-outlook groups exhibited heightened well-being across several, though not all, of the outcome measures across the 3 studies, relative to the comparison groups. The effect on positive affect appeared to be the most robust finding. Results suggest that a conscious focus on blessings may have emotional and interpersonal benefits.

The Journal of Happiness studies published a study that used letters of gratitude to test how being grateful can affect our levels of happiness:

Participants included 219 men and women who wrote three letters of gratitude over a 3 week period.

Results indicated that writing letters of gratitude increased participants’ happiness and life satisfaction, while decreasing depressive symptoms.

Quick last fact: Getting older will make yourself happier

As a final point, it’s interesting to note that as we get older, particularly past middle age, we tend to grow happier naturally. There’s still some debate over why this happens, but scientists have got a few ideas:

Researchers, including the authors, have found that older people shown pictures of faces or situations tend to focus on and remember the happier ones more and the negative ones less.

Other studies have discovered that as people age, they seek out situations that will lift their moods — for instance, pruning social circles of friends or acquaintances who might bring them down. Still other work finds that older adults learn to let go of loss and disappointment over unachieved goals, and hew their goals toward greater wellbeing.

So if you thought being old would make you miserable, rest assured that it’s likely you’ll develop a more positive outlook than you probably have now.

Photo credit: Spencer Finnley

Source: bufferapp.com

The Importance of the Lymphatic System

The Importance of the Lymphatic System!

By: Dr. Michael L. Johnson

The lymphatic system is the garbage collection system of the body.

The majority of the fluid that is carried by the lymphatic system consists of waste deposits from the cells. Each of us has the same amount of lymph as blood in our body. The only thing difference in the lymphatic system compared to the circulatory system is that it does not have a pump.

Lymph fluid is pumped through the vessels via the contraction of our muscles, our body’s own electro-magnetic field and even breathing. This is one of the many benefits of exercise because it moves lymph. A sluggish or clogged lymphatic system doesn’t allow the body to circulate the fluids and eliminate toxic waste buildup which can decrease the body’s immune function. As a result, there is an increase in swelling, inflammation and pain along with the possibility of contracting other diseases. Think of lymph nodes as small filters that can corner bacteria and prevent other nasty ‘surprises’ from invading your body. If they fail, those nodes may become infected with secondary tumors.

The Importance of the Lymphatic System

This is why our lymph system is CRITICAL when it comes to purging our body of waste material! It’s also responsible for distributing nutrients to each and every part of our body. How does the lymph system work? As stated, it doesn’t have a pump like the circulatory system’s heart so the lymph system “PUMPS” the lymph through the body when you EXERCISE!
Do you know what all of this means? It means you need to be active and exercise if you want to heal! This is why couch potatoes tend to develop chronic conditions earlier than those who exercise regularly and STICK to a healthy diet!

The lymph (which is basically recycled blood plasma) needs balanced chemistry within its structure to function properly in that system. This is why it needs to be healthy or full of the nutrients to stay fit, which is what a proper pH level can give it.

In order to maintain adequate pH levels, you need to have appropriate amounts of minerals such as calcium, magnesium and trace elements in your soft tissues. This is what gives the lymphatic system its fluidity. In other words, balanced lymph chemistry is essential for lymph to transport the minerals needed in the cells in order to re-alkalinize or balance the chemicals in the soft tissue. This in turn allows minerals to remain in the cell solution long enough to reach the cells.

To make this scenario possible, appropriate amounts of HCL need to be supplied by the body so that you can absorb the vital minerals needed to help your lymphatic system. In other words, you need adequate amounts of stomach acid (HCL) to digest your food.

Lymph is more than just waste, it is an amalgamation of enzymes, nutrients, sugars, cytokines and a other vital chemicals that coat the cells. As my good friend, Dr. Kevin Conners, likes to say, lymph is like “a healthy river, needing a constant flow of fresh nourishments, which prevents our body from turning it into a stagnant pond.”

Lymph is normally pumped throughout the whole body in lymph vessels as the muscles in your body contract and relax. These vessels also contain check valves that permit the passage of waste in one direction only. If your lymphatic system slows down, it will prevent the circulation of necessary nutrients, thus dulling the response of the immune system at the same time!

Do you know what that means? It means you will be highly susceptible to hidden infections that a strong immune system typically nips in the bud.

As you grow old, the amount of HCL that your body produces decreases. This decrease is caused by several factors such as eating processed or junk food, using illegal and legal drugs, and excess stress. However, some researchers back in the 1930’s discovered that this acid (HCL) is not the only thing necessary to balance lymph chemistry and balance the minerals needed to alkalinize the tissue. Your body also needs a suitable NATURAL POTASSIUM ACTIVATOR.

When you combine HCL and potassium, you enable your body to create the perfect acid/base balance it needs to balance the lymph chemistry (I know I sound like a broken record, only because of how important this balance is!)
Plus, the perfect HCL-Potassium partnership can actually boost HCL’s effectiveness as a global GERMICIDE.

Basically, this means it can hunt out HIDDEN infections, which can turn chronic if they remain undetected.
What is the take away? We found out that if your stomach acid is low, HCL supplementation along with potassium synergists can:

• Balance lymph chemistry by maintaining the medium those minerals need to freely move around the solution and deliver the necessary nutrients required by the body to ward off chronic diseases.
• Make the immune system active enough to detect hidden infections that can make the pH balance go awry. This usually happens when the minerals in the body abandon their purpose (which is to re-mineralize tissue) and go to fight off those infections instead.
You need to have the right amount of HCL to make that lymph flow smoothly and efficiently, as we have just discussed. When you have too little, nothing you do will make that lymph flow faster!

When you have enough stomach acid (HCL) in your system, you can form methyl groups easily. This is VITAL. For those of you who aren’t aware, methyl groups allow cells to replicate NORMALLY. In other words, it’s because of methyl groups positively affecting your DNA that you get a NEW BODY every year. Why? As I mentioned before, your body is constantly changing cells. Methyl groups help you form HEALTHY cells. Abnormal or low levels will promote the growth of UNHEALTHY cells which can lead to serious health issues!

—Dr. Michael L. Johnson

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

drjohnsonDr. Michael L. Johnson is a Board-Certified Chiropractic Neurologist who has been in private practice in Appleton, WI since 1983. He is a consultant to other doctors around the world (www.lifechangingcare.com) and he is the author of seven books which can be found at www.askdrjohnson.com. Dr. Johnson’s YouTube and Facebook pages can be found at “Dr. Michael Johnson.” You are welcome to email Dr. Johnson with questions and/or comments at mljohnson@askdrjohnson.com.

© 2013 Dr. Michael L. Johnson

****REPOSTERS’S NOTE

This is an excellent article.  Check out Dr. Johnson’s websites for even more good information.

Dr Johnson brings up 3 very important points that are in your control. Exercise, Balance minerals and Potassium Activator.

Below are my personal solutions. For me they are very effective in-spite of  me making some less than stellar lifestyle choices daily.  My lymph system and immune system function well so I no longer dread the annual cold and flu season. Because I was asthmatic – I have always been very susceptible to lungs and throat bugs that would persist for extended periods. A terrible cold & flu has been affecting our local area for over 2 months.  A couple of weeks ago I woke up with it at 4:00 am.  The dreaded bug had come to visit,  but because my lymph system is now functioning well and I have solutions, within 8 hours, I was fully functional and basically without symptoms.

So what do I do different that is so effective.   I drank some fresh lemon in hot water with honey and grated ginger plus I took some Echinecea and had an Oxygen Spa. By noon. I was still a bit more tired than usual and a tad stuffed up but was otherwise symptom free. 20 years ago – I would have had a high fever , horribly congested lungs and sinuses for at least 3 days followed by harsh coughing, irritated throat and a nose that would not stop running for the following 3 weeks. The cold and flu season was my Achilles heel.

My Lymph Solutions

1.) I know that I do not get enough physical activity.  Fortunately I have an Oxygen Spa and I bathe at least  twice per week in millions of Oxygen/ Ozone Bubbles in my bath tub. The bubbles colliding with my body and rupturing provide the same benefit to my lymph system as a 1 hour massage or a 1 – 3 km jog.. Using the Spa I am also exposed to significant amounts of negative ions. which provide innumerable health benefits. The Oxygen Spa also has an alkalizing effect on our bodies. It is the smartest health improvement and wellness tool I have ever purchased. As a Wellness Coach and a Consumer, it is the most effective stand alone device that I have ever used and continue to use.  Here is a short video. Should you want more info or to purchase – contact me by e-mail at allaboutwellness@mail.com or call Deb at (780) 363 – 2492 Canada.

2.)  I take an excellent liquid vitamin mineral supplement, Daily Complete, that provides 194 vitamins and minerals derived from natural and organic sources. It is  recognized by the medical community and is found in the Canadian and American Physicians Desk Reference. I have it automatically delivered to my home every month so we don’t run out because we know how important to our health it is. Here is a link to the Daily Complete information  http://deb.awarenesslife.com/index.cfm?action=details&detail=complete . Main website http://deb.awarenesslife.com/,

3.) We incorporate at least 1 banana per day into our diet to ensure we are getting natural source potassium.   As well we cook with a  number  of the foods found in this excellent Huffington Post article.  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/09/20/potassium-foods-banana_n_1898078.html We love banana bread and this banana bar that is also a great no sugar added energy bar or breakfast bar. My husband has a very sweet tooth so I vary the recipe by adding dark chocolate chunks, dried cranberries or dates. I often make 3 or 4 base batches at once and vary the ingredients. They store well in the fridge and freezer. So when we need that pick me up or just want a sweet snack , we have a very handy tasty choice.  Here is a link to the Banana Bar recipe   https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=574930432528694&set=a.306733809348359.74231.113301848691557&type=1&theater

Because these are simple, easy and enjoyable, my solutions are just naturally part of our life, no big lifestyle changes needed. As a result it is easy to be consistent and benefit from significantly improved lymph and immune function. Take an Oxygen Spa bath instead of a shower, finish dinner off with a 1 oz great tasting liquid vitamin mineral and eat good for us food. You are going to eat and get clean – tweak what you are already doing and reap some pretty significant benefits

Do not use antacids for heartburn – use Apple Cider Vinegar liquid or tablets daily instead – heartburn issues disappear and HCL production becomes normalized.  We were shocked at how effective this is. Hubby is a die hard coffee drinker. Apple Cider Vinegar has got him off all OTC and prescription solutions. His digestion and bowel function are now functioning like when he was a young man. Now that everything is back on track he only takes a tablet or 2 a week when he thinks about it.

Take Care of your Lymph (your bodies garbage collection system) and  it will take care of you!

The Habits Of Supremely Happy People

The Habits Of Supremely Happy People

The Huffington Post  |  By Posted: 09/16/2013 8:35 am EDT  |  Updated: 09/18/2013 4:14 pm EDT

happiness habits

Martin Seligman, the father of positive psychology, theorizes that while 60 percent of happiness is determined by our genetics and environment, the remaining 40 percent is up to us.

In his 2004 Ted Talk, Seligman describes three different kinds of happy lives: The pleasant life, in which you fill your life with as many pleasures as you can, the life of engagement, where you find a life in your work, parenting, love and leisure and the meaningful life, which “consists of knowing what your highest strengths are, and using them to belong to and in the service of something larger than you are.”

After exploring what accounts for ultimate satisfaction, Seligman says he was surprised. The pursuit of pleasure, research determined, has hardly any contribution to a lasting fulfillment. Instead, pleasure is “the whipped cream and the cherry” that adds a certain sweetness to satisfactory lives founded by the simultaneous pursuit of meaning and engagement.

And while it might sound like a big feat to to tackle great concepts like meaning and engagement (pleasure sounded much more doable), happy people have habits you can introduce into your everyday life that may add to the bigger picture of bliss. Joyful folk have certain inclinations that add to their pursuit of meaning — and motivate them along the way.

They surround themselves with other happy people.
cosby show
Joy is contagious. Researchers of the Framingham Heart Study who investigated the spread of happiness over 20 years found that those who are surrounded by happy people “are more likely to become happy in the future.” This is reason enough to dump the Debbie Downers and spend more time with uplifting people.

They smile when they mean it.
Even if you’re not feeling so chipper, cultivating a happy thought — and then smiling about it — could up your happiness levels and make you more productive, according to a study published in the Academy of Management Journal. It’s important to be genuine with your grin: The study revealed that faking a smile while experiencing negative emotions could actually worsen your mood.

They cultivate resilience.
penny heads up
According to psychologist Peter Kramer, resilience, not happiness, is the opposite of depression: Happy people know how to bounce back from failure. Resilience is like a padding for the inevitable hardship human beings are bound to face. As the Japanese proverb goes, “Fall seven times and stand up eight.”

They try to be happy.
Yep — it’s as simple as it sounds: just trying to be happy can boost your emotional well-being, according to two studies recently published in The Journal of Positive Psychology. Those who actively tried to feel happier in the studies reported the highest level of positive moods, making a case for thinking yourself happy.

They are mindful of the good.
It’s important to celebrate great, hard-earned accomplishments, but happy people give attention to their smaller victories, too. “When we take time to notice the things that go right — it means we’re getting a lot of little rewards throughout the day,” Susan Weinschenk, Ph.D. told The Huffington Post in May. “That can help with our moods.” And, as Frank Ghinassi, Ph.D. explains, being mindful of the things that do go your way (even something as simple as the barista getting your coffee order right) can make you feel a greater sense of accomplishment throughout the day.

They appreciate simple pleasures.

A meticulously swirled ice cream cone. An boundlessly waggy dog. Happy people take the time to appreciate these easy-to-come-by pleasures. Finding meaning in the little things, and practicing gratitude for all that you do have is associated with a sense of overall gladness.

They devote some of their time to giving.
Even though there are only 24 hours in a day, positive people fill some of that time doing good for others, which in return, does some good for the do-gooders themselves. A long-term research project called Americans’ Changing Lives found a bevy of benefits associated with altruism: “Volunteer work was good for both mental and physical health. People of all ages who volunteered were happier and experienced better physical health and less depression,” reported Peggy Thoits, the leader of one of the studies.

Givers also experience what researchers call “the helper’s high,” a euphoric state experienced by those engaged in charitable acts. “This is probably a literal “high,” similar to a drug-induced high,” writes Christine L. Carter, Ph.D. “The act of making a financial donation triggers the reward center in our brains that is responsible for dopamine-mediated euphoria.”

They let themselves lose track of time. (And sometimes they can’t help it.)
doodling
When you’re immersed in an activity that is simultaneously challenging, invigorating and meaningful, you experience a joyful state called “flow.” Happy people seek this sensation of getting “caught up” or “carried away,” which diminishes self-consciousness and promotes the feelings associated with success. As explained by Pursuit-of-happiness.org, “In order for a Flow state to occur, you must see the activity as voluntary, enjoyable (intrinsically motivating), and it must require skill and be challenging (but not too challenging) with clear goals towards success.”

They nix the small talk for deeper conversation.
Nothing wrong with shootin’ the you-know-what every now and then, but sitting down to talk about what makes you tick is a prime practice for feeling good about life. A study published in Psychological Science found that those who take part in more substantive conversation and less trivial chit chat experienced more feelings of satisfaction.

“I wish I’d had the courage to express my feelings,” is one of the top five regrets of the dying — a sentiment that hints at the fact that people wish they’d spent less time talking about the weather and more time delving into what it is that makes their heart swell.

They spend money on other people.
monty hall
Maybe money does buy happiness. A study published in Science found that spending money on other people has a more direct impact on happiness than spending money on oneself.

They make a point to listen.
“When you listen you open up your ability to take in more knowledge versus blocking the world with your words or your distracting thoughts,” writes David Mezzapelle, author of Contagious Optimism. “You are also demonstrating confidence and respect for others. Knowledge and confidence is proof that you are secure and positive with yourself thus radiating positive energy.” Good listening is a skill that strengthens relationships and leads to more satisfying experiences. A good listener may walk away from a conversation feeling as if their presence served a purpose, an experience that is closely connected with increased well-being.

They uphold in-person connections.
It’s quick and convenient to text, FaceTime and tweet at your buddies. But spending the money on a flight to see your favorite person across the country has weight when it comes to your well-being. “There’s a deep need to have a sense of belonging that comes with having personal interactions with friends,” says John Cacioppo, Ph.D., the director of the Center of Cognitive and Social Neuroscience at the University of Chicago. Social media, while it keeps us in touch, doesn’t allow us to physically touch, which harvests the warm-and-fuzzies and even decreases feelings of anxiety.

They look on the bright side.

Optimism touts plenty of health benefits, including less stress, a better tolerance for pain and, as HuffPost Healthy Living recently reported, longevity among those with heart disease. When you choose to see the silver lining, you’re also choosing health and happiness.

Seligman summed up perhaps the greatest characteristic of the optimist in one of his most acclaimed books, Learned Optimism:

The defining characteristic of pessimists is that they tend to believe bad events will last a long time, will undermine everything they do, and are their own fault. The optimists, who are confronted with the same hard knocks of this world, think about misfortune in the opposite way. They tend to believe defeat is just a temporary setback, that its causes are confined to this one case. The optimists believe defeat is not their fault: Circumstances, bad luck, or other people brought it about. Such people are unfazed by defeat. Confronted by a bad situation, they perceive it as a challenge and try harder.

They value a good mixtape.
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Music is powerful. So powerful, in fact, that it could match up to the anxiety-reducing effects of massage therapy. Over a three month period, researchers from the Group Health Research Institute found that patients who simply listened to music had the same decreased anxiety symptoms as those who got 10 hour-long massages. Choosing the right tunes could be an important factor, however, as a happy or sad song can also affect the way we perceive the world. In one experiment where researchers asked subjects to identify happy or sad faces while listening to music, the participants were more likely to see the faces that matched the “mood” of the music. Click here for a few of our favorite mood-boosting jams.

They unplug.
Whether by meditating, taking a few deep breaths away from the screen or deliberately disconnecting from electronics, unplugging from our hyper-connected world has proven advantages when it comes to happiness. Talking on your cell could increase your blood pressure and raise your stress levels, while uninterrupted screen time has been linked to depression and fatigue. Technology isn’t going away, but partaking in some kind of a digital detox gives your brain the opportunity to recharge and recover, which — bonus — could increase your resilience.

They get spiritual.
sun salutation
Studies point to a link between religious and spiritual practice and mirth. For one, happiness habits like expressing gratitude, compassion and charity are generally promoted in most spiritual conventions. And, asking the big questions helps to give our lives context and meaning. A 2009 study found that children who felt their lives had a purpose (which was promoted by a spiritual connection) were happier.

Spirituality offers what the 20th-century sociologist Emile Durkheim referred to as “sacred time,” which is a built-in, unplugging ritual that elicits moments of reflection and calm. As Ellen L. Idler, Ph.D., writes in “The Psychological and Physical Benefits of Spiritual/Religious Practices,”:

The experience of sacred time provides a time apart from the “profane time” that we live most of our lives in. A daily period of meditation, a weekly practice of lighting Sabbath candles, or attending worship services, or an annual retreat in an isolated, quiet place of solitude all of these are examples of setting time apart from the rush of our everyday lives. Periods of rest and respite from work and the demands of daily life serve to reduce stress, a fundamental cause of chronic diseases that is still the primary causes of death in Western society. Transcendent spiritual and religious experiences have a positive, healing, restorative effect, especially if they are “built in,” so to speak, to one’s daily, weekly, seasonal, and annual cycles of living

They make exercise a priority.
A wise, albeit fictional Harvard Law School student once said, “Exercise gives you endorphins. Endorphins make you happy.” Exercise has been shown to ease symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress, thanks to the the various brain chemicals that are released that amplify feelings of happiness and relaxation. Plus, working out makes us appreciate our bodies more. One study published in the Journal of Health Psychology found that exercise improved how people felt about their bodies — even if they didn’t lose weight or achieve noticeable improvements.

They go outside.
Want to feel alive? Just a 20-minute dose of fresh air promotes a sense of vitality, according to several studies published in the Journal of Environmental Psychology. “Nature is fuel for the soul, ” says Richard Ryan, Ph.D, the lead author of the studies. “Often when we feel depleted we reach for a cup of coffee, but research suggests a better way to get energized is to connect with nature.” And while most of us like our coffee hot, we may prefer our serving of the great outdoors at a more lukewarm temperature: A study on weather and individual happiness unveiled 57 degrees to be the optimal temperature for optimal happiness.

They spend some time on the pillow.
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Waking up on the wrong side of the bed isn’t just a myth. When you’re running low on zzs, you’re prone to experience lack of clarity, bad moods and poor judgment. “A good night’s sleep can really help a moody person decrease their anxiety,” Dr. Raymonde Jean, director of sleep medicine and associate director of critical care at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center told Health.com. “You get more emotional stability with good sleep.”

They LOL.
You’ve heard it before: Laughter is the best medicine. In the case of The Blues, this may hold some truth. A good, old-fashioned chuckle releases happy brain chemicals that, other than providing the exuberant buzz we seek, make humans better equipped to tolerate both pain and stress.

And you might be able to get away with counting a joke-swapping session as a workout (maybe). “The body’s response to repetitive laughter is similar to the effect of repetitive exercise,” explained Dr. Lee Berk, the lead researcher of a 2010 study focused on laughter’s effects on the body. The same study found that some of the benefits associated with working out, like a healthy immune system, controlled appetite and improved cholesterol can also be achieved through laughter.

They walk the walk.

Ever notice your joyful friends have a certain spring in the step? It’s all about the stride, according to research conducted by Sara Snodgrass, a psychologist from Florida Atlantic University.

In the experiment, Snodgrass asked participants to take a three-minute walk. Half of the walkers were told to take long strides while swinging their arms and holding their heads high. These walkers reported feeling happier after the stroll than the other group, who took short, shuffled steps as they watched their feet.

Reposter’s Note

Truly Excellent Article. I would like to add –

Find something to participate in that you can be passionate about and do something with it.

Get up and get going – do something and finish it, the laundry, the dishes, finishing even a small task brings a sense of accomplishment and satisfaction.

Start a to do list and check things off as you achieve them – more gets accomplished especially more of what you want.

Day Dream – make a point of it at least once a week – it helps us figure out what we think we want, then we can make a plan and work towards that.

Make a Bucket List – it can include things as simple as making a souffle or as grandiose as visiting Manchu Pichu. Do a bit of research and you will be surprised  what experiences, people and places come to pass in your experience.

Always remember AND THIS TOO SHALL PASS whatever the situation. So savoir the moment.

Find the bright side  – there is always one even though it may not become apparent for sometime.

Give  lot of Hugs – they do amazing things for both the giver and receiver.

Add music to your life that is melodious.

Day to day happiness is appreciating the moment – that first sip of an excellent coffee, the smile of a friend that first moment they see you, the smell of rain, the first bite a garden fresh strawberry, those first moments when you awake and the pillow feels so good. Make a habit of acknowledging those moments – being grateful brings more to be grateful for(more happiness)

Make a birthday list and tell those people on their special day – it will brighten the day for both of you.

Share your life with a pet. Yes they take commitment but studies show the rewards emotionally, mentally and physically are extremely beneficial and raise your happiness level significantly.

Take a really good liquid vitamin/mineral supplement every day. Nutrition plays a huge role in how we feel. It is difficult to get the best nutrition unless you take the time and make the effort.  We eat well but even that can still leave gaps. My personal preference after a lot of searching is Daily Complete. My husband likes the taste so much he says he could drink a cup every day. ( his ounce everyday is one of those moments he savors and looks forward too).

Here is the link http://deb.awarenesslife.com/index.cfm?action=details&detail=complete.

No one is perfect – our imperfections make us each unique and perfect in being ourselves.

Life is a myriad of experiences and emotions. Technology is wonderful but it often has us using our time in less participative ways. Life is a participation sport not something to be watched on a screen. Happiness is a by product of true participation and appreciation. Participate and appreciate – more happiness will follow you the rest of your days.

10 Easy Tips Science Has Proven Will Make You Happier Today

10 Easy Activities Science Has Proven Will Make You Happier Today

Post image for 10 Easy Activities Science Has Proven Will Make You Happier Today

A thankful message, spending on others, listening to music, happy daydreams and more…

Science can make you happier. Do at least some of these activities today and feel the positive vibrations flow. Keep it going for a week or longer and feel your mood lift.

1. Mentally subtract something good from your life

People spend a lot of time thinking about good things that didn’t happen, but might have done. But what about the good things that did happen that might not have?

Say you’d never met your partner or friend or got that job? What would life be like without some of those things we take for granted?

Thinking about what might not have been can be tremendously powerful if used in the right way. Counter-factual thinking can create meaning in life and, and can increase satisfaction with what you have (Koo et al., 2008).

So, mentally subtract something good from your life to really appreciate it.

2. Send a thankful message

Gratitude is a powerful emotion that helps us enjoy what we have.

Evoke it right now by sending an email, text or letter to someone who has helped you in some way. Thank them for what they have done for you, however small.

It’s easy and quick and one study has found that practising gratitude can increase happiness 25%. Another found that just three letters over a three-week period was enough to reliably increase happiness and life satisfaction (Toepfer et al., 2012).

3. Spend money on someone else

Money can make you happy but only if you use it in the right way.

One of the easiest ways is by spending it on others. So, why does spending on others increase your happiness?

“It’s partly because giving to others makes us feel good about ourselves. It helps promote a view of ourselves as responsible and giving people, which in turn makes us feel happy. It’s also partly because spending money on others helps cement our social relationships. And people with stronger social ties are generally happier.”

So, buy a friend a present today or take them out to lunch. You’ll feel good about it, I promise.

4. Get some exercise

What’s the number one strategy that people use to feel better, increase their energy levels and reduce tension? Exercise.

It doesn’t have to be a marathon; a simple walk around the block will do the trick. We all know it’ll make us feel better to get out and stretch our legs, but there are always excuses to avoid it.

If you’re at home, make time for a trip that doesn’t involve the car and does involve your legs. If you’re in the office, make sure you get out for a walk at lunch-time instead of eating sandwiches in front of the computer.

5. Listen to music

Number two on the list of all time top strategies people use for feeling better is: listening to music.

Music can influence mood in many ways but most people rate its power to manage our positive moods as the top reason they love music. We particularly like the fact that it can make our good moods even better.

Even sad music can bring pleasure as many people enjoy the contradictory mix of emotions it creates.

6. Make plans…7. …with friends

Remember those childhood days leading up to Christmas when you couldn’t wait to rip open your presents? The pleasure in anticipation was just incredible.

Research on the psychology of happiness shows that anticipation can be a powerful positive emotion. We enjoy looking forward to things much more than we enjoy looking back on them afterwards (Van Boven & Ashworth, 2007).

So, make a plan now and try to always have something to look forward to, however small.

7. …with friends

The best types of plans to make are with friends.

It’s not just that you’ll have the pleasure of anticipation; it’s also that you’re keeping the friendship alive.

One study of 8 million phone calls has found, not exactly surprisingly, that when people call each other back, their friendships are much more likely to survive (Hidalgo & Rogriguez-Sickert, 2007).

If an economic incentive might help motivate you to make plans with friends, then here is one from research that attempted to put a monetary value on different types of social relationships (Powdthavee, 2008):

“…a move from “seeing friends or relatives less than once a month” to “seeing friends or relatives on most days” is now estimated to be worth an extra £85,000 a year for a representative individual”

In other words: you’d have to earn £85,000 ($130,000) more a year to make you as happy as if you saw friends or relatives on most days of the week.

So, not only is staying in touch with friends good, but it’ll save you a lot of effort trying to earn more money at work.

8. List 3 good things that happened today

At the end of the day, before you go to bed, spend a few minutes thinking about three good things that happened today. They don’t have to be that amazing; just three things that made you feel a little better. You can also think about why they happened.

In one study in which people carried out this exercise, their happiness was increased, and depressive symptoms decreased, fully six months afterwards (Seligman et al., 2005).

If you’ve done some of the things mentioned here, then you’ll already have at least three things for your list.

9. Practice your signature strengths

Simply put this means doing things you are good at. Whatever it is, people are usually cheered up when they do things at which they excel.

Think about things that you are good at: it could be social skills, physical skills, sporting skills or anything really. It could be making someone laugh or giving someone a helping hand.

Then take some time during the day to use that skill. When people practice their signature strengths it makes them happier.

10. A happy daydream

If you’re less of a doer and more of a dreamer, then this activity is for you: have a happy daydream.

Over the course of the day our minds tend to wander a lot, but directing that mind-wandering in a positive way can be very beneficial.

In this research on life-savouring strategies, positive mental time travel was found to be one of the most effective. In the study people thought back to times in their lives that gave them pleasure; moments filled with success, love and friendship.

The mind may try to fight back by traveling back to past embarrassments or failures, but keep it locked into a happy daydream for the best boost.

Go on, sit back and have a little daydream…

Image credit: Victor Nuno

→ Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is “Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick” http://www.spring.org.uk/2013/07/10-easy-activities-science-has-proven-will-make-you-happier-today.php

Reposters Note –

All of the above points are excellent – here are a few of more that work for us.

Take a really good liquid vitamin/mineral,  it keeps you feeling more upbeat and energized. Here is a link to the best one I have found.  Go check it outhttp://deb.awarenesslife.com/index.cfm?action=details&detail=complete

Get enough good sleep – most of us are sleep deprived then try to play catch-up which doesn’t work.

Get plenty of sunshine with out sunglasses. Sunshine stimulates the brain to make serotonin via light receptors in the eyes.

Up your Vitamin D intake – It is called the sunshine vitamin because your body can make it when skin is exposed to the sun but has also been proven to enhance mood. Most of us are deficient so getting more gets us more day to day happiness.

Sometimes we all just need a really good cry – watch a real tear-jerker – sob your heart out, you will have a great sleep and wake up feeling much lighter.

Join a group that does something you have always wanted to learn – you meet interesting people and get to do something you have always wanted too.

Volunteer – Doing something from the heart with others who are doing the same just plain makes you feel good. I find volunteers to be happy groups of people and Happiness is contagious.

Go Dancing – Music and exercise together – There is nothing better.

20 Things The Rich Do Every Day – Create Habits & Behaviours That Serve You

20 Things The Rich Do Every Day

So what do the rich do every day that the poor don’t do?

Tom Corley, on his website RichHabits.net, outlines a few of the differences between the habits of the rich and the poor:

1. 70% of wealthy eat less than 300 junk food calories per day. 97% of poor people eat more than 300 junk food calories per day. 23% of wealthy gamble. 52% of poor people gamble.

2. 80% of wealthy are focused on accomplishing some single goal. Only 12% of the poor do this.

3. 76% of wealthy exercise aerobically 4 days a week. 23% of poor do this.

4. 63% of wealthy listen to audio books during commute to work vs. 5% for poor people.

5. 81% of wealthy maintain a to-do list vs. 19% for poor.

6. 63% of wealthy parents make their children read 2 or more non-fiction books a month vs. 3% for poor.7. 70% of wealthy parents make their children volunteer 10 hours or more a month vs. 3% for poor.8. 80% of wealthy make hbd (Happy Birthday) calls vs. 11% of poor

9. 67% of wealthy write down their goals vs. 17% for poor

10. 88% of wealthy read 30 minutes or more each day for education or career reasons vs 2% for poor.

11. 6% of wealthy say what’s on their mind vs. 69% for poor.

12. 79% of wealthy network 5 hours or more each month vs. 16% for poor.

13. 67% of wealthy watch 1 hour or less of TV. every day vs. 23% for poor

14. 6% of wealthy watch reality TV vs. 78% for poor.

15. 44% of wealthy wake up 3 hours before work starts vs.3% for poor.

16. 74% of wealthy teach good daily success habits to their children vs. 1% for poor.

17. 84% of wealthy believe good habits create opportunity luck vs. 4% for poor.

18. 76% of wealthy believe bad habits create detrimental luck vs. 9% for poor.

19. 86% of wealthy believe in life-long educational self-improvement vs. 5% for poor.

20. 86% of wealthy love to read vs. 26% for poor.

Growing up, we had an uncle who was a self made millionaire. When I read these 20 Things, they very much remind me of Uncle Eddy.
He was of above average intelligence, self educated, well traveled, generous, very interesting as well as daunting. If you asked him a question – he made you work to learn the answer yourself.
He spent many Christmas’s with us, His presents were the best not only because they were the most expensive but because they always came in parts. So if you got a new bike, ski’s, wagon, whatever – a good part of the day was spent working with him and Dad to build your present. There were 6 of us kids – so it was a  fun day of working together with them. Those were definitely some of our best Christmas’s.

Uncle Eddy – Always told us, Work smart – not hard

He read everyday, he always had a little note pad with a  list of what he needed to get done. It came out of his pocket often so he could add to it or cross off accomplished items. He always scheduled holidays and sometimes took some of us kids.

If you went on a holiday with him – you stopped at every landmark and learned about it etc. There was always time to get proper rest or learn something new, We never got fast food or junk food – every meal was a proper sit down meal.

He tipped well, was polite and engaging, so the waitresses always gave us the best service and went out of their way to provide excellent service. That he was well dressed, good looking and had a great smile made people want to be the one to provide whatever service he required.

Every new stop – no matter who he spoke to he stared the conversation with . Hi my name is Eddy and how are you today sir or ma’am, Then he would say why we were these and what we needed. For example, We are on our way to Vancouver so we need gas,  the oil and tires checked, washrooms and directions to the …. in town that serves the best lunches. (Clear concise effective communication) He always thanked who ever provided each service from busboy to concierge. He never passed a tip or donation jar without contributing.

He taught each one of my brothers chess as small children – he said it taught you to think ahead and plan your moves so you could WORK SMART NOT HARD.

Television was to watch the news and weather or Ed Sullivan.

He always pitched in until the work was done and  was very generous with his time and money. When he was not actively doing something he was reading or learning.

Until I read this list – I didn’t fully realize that what he accomplished, occurred because of how he had innately designed his life to succeed.

My husband, children and I had the honor caring for him in his last months – even then dying of brain cancer he was researching growing hemp and marketing it. He was planning a family trip for all of us to go to Alaska together.

Decide what you are doing today and get on with it. When you start something – finish it and move on. Make sure to plan to put some fun into everyday. You choose how you spend your time and if you don’t make a conscious choice you choose to waste your time.

He lived a very full life that was financially successful, well traveled and ever expanding. He embodied 20 Things The Rich Do Every Day.

We had a friend Earl who was financially stable and had a life rich in experiences. In many ways he also followed this list. He passed at 93 having hand made 700 puzzled trucks for charity that year. He started everyday by reading the paper cover to cover and dong the cross word puzzle. Both of them accomplished  a lot of good in their lives because they chose to live life every singe day.

How they lived each day – made their lives extraordinary in comparison  to most.

Our choices create our experience – so choose and do.  You will have a much richer life experience.
 Create a new life by creating habits that serve you. Start your To Do List and Your Bucket list today. See how much richer your life is a year from now.
This blog is full of articles that give you an array of choices that you can choose to add to your life so you have the health, wellness and energy to enjoy your richest life.  Please use anything you find of value in these posts to help you live your richest life no matter how you define rich.

Circulatory Problems, Lessened Naturally

See the bottom of this post for information on an all natural product that works like Draino for the Circulatory System – The information and suggestions in this re-posted article that follows are excellent but for many it will not make a big enough difference to eliminate or reduce prescription drugs,  but the solution at the end of the post can.

More than 50% of the population will suffer from Cardiovascular Disease.

It is the #1 cause of death and kills more people annually than the next 6 causes combined(Cancer included).

1 out of 2 people who die of Heart Attack or Stroke have no previous symptoms hence the nickname ‘ The Silent Killer’

Circulation problems occur when the blood flow is limited to parts of the body such as hands, feet, brain, heart, and lungs. Plaque builds up in our arteries and causes the restriction of blood flow and hardening of the arterial walls. Some of the diseases that can be caused by this include hypertension, stroke, varicose veins, Raynaud’s phenomenon, blood clots, kidney disease, heart disease, and peripheral artery disease.

Poor blood circulation can impact the entire body, including:

  • Effects upon the brain – poor blood circulation can impact the brain causing fatigue, dizziness, memory loss, and frequent and unexplained headaches.
  • Effects upon the heart – poor blood circulation can have an impact on the heart, causing inability to perform simple aerobic activities like climbing stairs without breathlessness; high blood pressure and cholesterol, and chest pain can be other symptoms. Heart attack and stroke are major risks of poor circulation that remains untreated.
  • Effects upon the liver – symptoms of poor blood circulation in the liver can include lack of appetite or unexplained weight loss, and changes in skin tone.
  • Effects upon the kidneys – poor circulation to the kidneys are typically the result when there is swelling of the hands, feet and ankles. Other symptoms can include fatigue, altered heart rate and rise in blood pressure.
  • Effects upon the limbs – with poor circulation, cramps in the limbs, numbness and varicose veins can appear as symptoms.

Symptoms include :

  • Numbness, tingling, or loss of sensation in extremities
  • Cold hands, feet, or ears
  • Fatigue
  • Hair loss
  • Dizziness
  • Dry and/or Itchy Skin
  • Edema
  • Varicose veins
  • Leg or foot ulcerations
  • Headaches
  • Muscle cramps
  • Dandruff
  • Shortness of Breath
  • Sluggish Memory

Medical problems that can cause contribute to poor circulation include smoking, anxiety, diabetes, high cholesterol, weight gain, high blood pressure, heart problems, anemia, asthma, food allergies, bronchitis, pneumonia, emphysema, eating disorders, and many others. A doctor will need to determine the cause before administering treatment.

Mild cases can be improved with aerobic exercise and diet. A person should exercise regularly and eat a low-fat high-fiber diet. If the person has mobility problems due to a stroke or something similar regular assisted range of motion exercises will help.

Foods that improve circulation are fruits, especially those rich in Vitamin C and lycopene, think citrus, watermelon, and tomatoes, nuts, which are rich in Vitamin B3, garlic, and avoiding fatty and sugary foods.

Diet and exercise should be used at a pace you are comfortable with, in severe cases they should be used in conjunction with your doctor’s plan and advice. Inform your doctor of any changes you are making to diet and exercise.

Source: http://www.nativeremedies.com/ailment/increase-poor-blood-circulation.html

***A great natural product that I have spent a lot of time researching and have clients using with great success at reversing Cardiovascular Disease is Proargi 9+. It works like Draino in cleaning out plaque even in our smallest of blood vessel. With added blood flow, oxygen and nutrients to  every part of the body, our body works better so can and does repair itself over time.

Ladies – We now suffer more heart attacks than men!

Heart Disease can be reversed. 

ProArgi-9+ is one of the best products I have ever experienced. It changes Lives!

It is simple, easy and works for both men and women!

Backed by a 120 day money back Guarantee! – ProArgi-9+

Contact me (Deb) at allaboutwellness@mail.com for more info.

(Please do contact me  so I can guide you to seeing the quickest results as well as connecting you with the science and proven results)

Check out the following presentation to learn more . http://www.heartpro.me/

My other posts on this topic.

https://allaboutwellnesssolutions.wordpress.com/tag/cardiovascular-system/ .  Cardiovascular System – The science and real world studies on ProArgi-9+.

https://allaboutwellnesssolutions.wordpress.com/2013/02/15/february-is-heart-month-drink-yourself-to-heart-health/

Should you want to order here is the link , My name is DEB ST JEAN  my ID number is 1309426

http://www.synergyworldwide.com/SetCountry.aspx#

Where there are Synergy offices that ship orders –