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What – You Still Think Salt Consumption Causes High Blood Pressure?

What – You Still Think Salt Consumption Causes High Blood Pressure?

October 23rd, 2013salt blood pressure 263x164 What – You Still Think Salt Consumption Causes High Blood Pressure?
High sodium intake as a source of high blood pressure has been an unchallenged dogmatic mantra for decades. But a few renegade MDs, several naturopaths, and chiropractors have challenged the unproven hypothesis of salt being the basis of high blood pressure (HBP). Turns out that the link between high sodium intake and elevated blood pressure is a false one.

Pure, unrefined salt is actually a necessary and helpful dietary component. Perhaps the most well known salt promoter is Dr. David Brownstein, MD, author of Salt Your Way to HealthRefined commercial table salt, used excessively in processed foods, is processed with toxic chemicals and stripped of its inherent nutritional value. It’s mostly poison with very little nutrition, though even using table salt often won’t lead to high blood pressure.

Actually, those with high blood pressure (and everyone, really) should just consume more foods rich in potassium. Meta-analysis’ show how low potassium intake has the same impact on blood pressure as high salt consumption – the real problem is an imbalance between sodium and potassium.

It appears the new HBP dietary villain could be high fructose corn syrup (HFCS), which has been already linked to obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular health issues.

HFCS is more commonly used in processed foods, fruit juices, sweets, and sodas than cane or beet sugar. It’s cheaper than sucrose (table sugar), and satisfies the “sweet tooth” SAD (standard American diet) consumers’ desire.

According to the USDA, HFCS consumption has increased significantly from 1970 to 2005, and it is now the number one source of empty calories in America. In fact, Americans eat approximately 35 lbs on average of high-fructose corn syrup each year.

How HFCS Contributes to Hypertension or High Blood Pressure

Fructose in fruit is tied to several other nutritional compounds that balance out fructose’s negative aspects. But fructose isolated from corn and made into a syrup is too much for the body to metabolize. Even table sugar metabolizes better.

Robert H. Lustig, MD, a Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Endocrinology, explains how the rise in HFCS use over the past three to four decades is behind the obesity and diabetes epidemic, both of which contribute to high blood pressure.

HFCS or “corn sugar” or “corn syrup” initiates a toxic overload from insufficient metabolism. The liver doesn’t convert isolated, concentrated fructose into energy well and stores it as fat instead. Add this to the dangers of GMO corn with traces of extremely toxic glyphosate herbicides and mercury as a byproduct from the conversion process. This toxic overload leads to obesity, fatty liver, other liver complications, and kidney disease.

Dr. Richard Johnson of the University of Colorado has been a researcher of investigations into HFCS and high blood pressure. His research revealed definite links of high HFCS consumption to high blood pressure.

What’s more, one of the toxic waste products remaining in the body from regular HFCS consumption is uric acid. A test of 17 subjects with high uric acid counts showed all 17 with high blood pressure. Uric acid inhibits nitric oxide (NO) in the blood vessels.

Nitric oxide is a volatile gas that helps maintain blood vessel elasticity. When that elasticity decreases, blood pressure increases. Here are 4 ways to increase nitric oxide naturally.  (if you find that you can not increase NO through these suggestions see Deb’s Solution and the link below it. Nitric Oxide also dissolves plague in every blood vessel in the body including the brain so is extremely important in reversing and  preventing disease and it’s precursor inflammation)

A safe range of uric acid is from 3 to 5.5 milligrams per deciliter (0.1 liter), with 4 mg/dl ideal for men and 3.5 mg/dl for women. Higher numbers threaten blood pressure increases. You can ask your health professional about a uric acid test or shop the Internet by inserting “uric acid blood testing” in your search engine.

Additional Sources:

Mercola

UCDenver.edu

MensHealth

***Reposter’s note

I was uninformed about salt until a doctor friend pointed out saline is one of medicine faithful standbys. We were at dinner in the cafeteria and I commented on her bringing her own salt and that it was a good thing considering how much she used. She was using granulated Himalayan Sea Salt.

I use a wonderful all natural supplement that causes the body to naturally create more Nitric Oxide. Based on Nobel Prize winning Science, world renowned Cardiologists are turning to it as a solution. Attached is an article that demonstrates real world health total recovery from the abyss of heart disease after exhausting all medical options. One example highlights a 72 year old patient, who went from not being able walk across a room to a daily workout that that most healthy much younger individuals can not complete. Read his story.

Nitric Oxide  production is hugely important.  Nitric Oxide relaxes our blood vessels and dissolves plague.  Plaque causes heart attacks, stoke,   Alzheimers and  dementia. It plays a role in reducing function in every organ. The more Nitric Oxide we produce the healthier our blood vessels. The healthier our blood vessels, the better every part of our body works, that includes the brain and every organ of the body. Of course as we age, we progressively produce less Nitric Oxide – go figure.

My husband was told he would be on oxygen full time by the age of 50. His shortness of breath during exertion was becoming very concerning. I had taken him to emergency because I thought he was having a heart attack and he was scared enough to go. (He is very stubborn – getting him to go to the doctor only happens when he is in extreme pain  or very scared.) My solution has given him his stamina and ability to complete exertion tasks back to levels he was at many years ago. I was impressed enough, I have chosen to distribute the product and let other people know about it because it helped  my husband and will keep me from losing him before his time.

I am so thankful my friend Sharon educated me on this solution, I know she saved my husband’s life and health. I want to pay it forward so other spouses, sisters, brothers, children, parents and freinds at least have the knowledge to choose to do something effective and practical. Knowledge is power and for some of us this knowledge will give us the power to make a change that will gives us a a much healthier future.

Deb’s Solution

(ordering instructions available in link below). It is sometimes difficult to eat enough to over come imbalances when our health has been significantly impacted.

(includes ordering instructions)

Here is a post to help you find those high potassium foods.  Thank You to Health·Alicious·Ness .com for the following article. For even more information visit the full article.***

Top 10 Foods Highest in Potassium

Potassium is an essential nutrient used to maintain fluid and electrolyte balance in the body. A deficiency in potassium causes fatigue, irritability, and hypertension (increased blood pressure). Unless you are on dialysis, or have a special condition, overdose of potassium from natural sources is nearly impossible; however, it is possible to consume too much potassium via potassium salts which can lead to nausea, vomiting, and even cardiac arrest. Potassium from natural food sources, like the ones listed below, are considered safe and healthy. The current percent daily value for potassium is 3.5 grams. Below is a list of high potassium foods ranked by common serving sizes, for more please see the lists of high potassium foods by nutrient density, potassium rich foods, fruits high in potassium, and vegetables high in potassium.


#1: White Beans

Potassium in 100g 1 cup cooked (179g)
561mg (16% DV) 1004mg (29% DV)

Other Beans High in Potassium (%DV per cup): Adzuki (35%), Soy (28%), Lima (28%), Kidney (20%), Great Northern (20%), Pinto (18%) and others at an average of 15% DV per cup cooked. Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#2: Dark Leafy Greens (Spinach)

Potassium 100g (Raw) 1 Cup (Raw – 30g) 1 Cup (Cooked – 180g)
558mg (16% DV) 167mg (5% DV) 839mg (24% DV)

Other Greens High in Potassium (%DV per cup cooked): Swiss Chard (27% DV), Kale (8% DV), and Collards (6% DV).
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#3: Baked Potatoes (With Skin)

Potassium 100g Average Potato (173g)
535mg (15% DV) 926mg (26% DV)

Warning: Potatoes are high in simple carbohydrates and not recommended for people with diabetes. Sweet potatoes are actually better for regulation blood sugar, an average baked sweet potato with skin (114g) provides 542mg (15% DV) of potassium. Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#4: Dried Apricots

Potassium 100g 1/2 cup (65g)
1162mg (33% DV) 755mg (22% DV)

Other Dried Fruits High in Potassium (%DV per 1/2 cup): Peaches (22% DV), Prunes (20% DV), Raisins (18% DV).
Warning: Dried fruits are high in sugar. Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#5: Baked Acorn Squash

Potassium 100g 1 cup cubed (205g)
437mg (12% DV) 899mg (26% DV)

Other Squash High in Potassium (%DV per cup baked): Hubbard (21%), Butternut (17% DV), Zucchini (14% DV), Average Winter Squash (10% DV). Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#6: Yogurt (Plain, Skim/Non-Fat)

Potassium 100g 1 cup (245g)
255mg (7% DV) 625mg (18% DV)

Other Yogurt High in Potassium (%DV per cup): Whole-Fat (11% DV), Chocolate Yogurt (24% DV). Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#7: Fish (Salmon)

Potassium 100g 1 3oz fillet (85g)
628mg (18% DV) 534mg (15% DV)

Other Fish High in Potassium (%DV per 3oz fillet (85g)): Pompano (15% DV), Lingcod (14% DV), Halibut (13% DV), Yellowfin Tuna (13% DV), Anchovies (12% DV), Mackerel (10% DV), Herring (10% DV) and most other fish at an average of 10% DV. Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#8: Avocados

Potassium 100g Average Avocado (201g) 1/2 Cup Pureed (115)
485mg (14% DV) 975mg (28% DV) 558mg (16% DV)

An average avocado provides 322 calories, half a cup purred contains 184 calories. Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#9: Mushrooms (White)

Potassium 100g 1 cup sliced (108g)
396mg (11% DV) 428mg (12% DV)

1 cup cooked sliced white mushrooms contain 28 calories.
Other mushrooms high in potassium (%DV per cup sliced): Portabella (9% DV), Brown or Crimini (9% DV), Enoki (7% DV), Shiitake (5% DV), Maitake (4% DV). Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#10: Bananas

Potassium 100g Average Banana(118g) 1 Cup Mashed (225)
358mg (10% DV) 422mg (12% DV) 806mg (23% DV)

An average banana provides 105 calories, 1 cup mashed contains 200 calories. Click to see complete nutrition facts.

Top 10 Foods Highest in Potassium

Potassium is an essential nutrient used to maintain fluid and electrolyte balance in the body. A deficiency in potassium causes fatigue, irritability, and hypertension (increased blood pressure). Unless you are on dialysis, or have a special condition, overdose of potassium from natural sources is nearly impossible; however, it is possible to consume too much potassium via potassium salts which can lead to nausea, vomiting, and even cardiac arrest. Potassium from natural food sources, like the ones listed below, are considered safe and healthy. The current percent daily value for potassium is 3.5 grams. Below is a list of high potassium foods ranked by common serving sizes, for more please see the lists of high potassium foods by nutrient density, potassium rich foods, fruits high in potassium, and vegetables high in potassium.

#1: White Beans

Potassium in 100g 1 cup cooked (179g)
561mg (16% DV) 1004mg (29% DV)

Other Beans High in Potassium (%DV per cup): Adzuki (35%), Soy (28%), Lima (28%), Kidney (20%), Great Northern (20%), Pinto (18%) and others at an average of 15% DV per cup cooked. Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#2: Dark Leafy Greens (Spinach)

Potassium 100g (Raw) 1 Cup (Raw – 30g) 1 Cup (Cooked – 180g)
558mg (16% DV) 167mg (5% DV) 839mg (24% DV)

Other Greens High in Potassium (%DV per cup cooked): Swiss Chard (27% DV), Kale (8% DV), and Collards (6% DV).
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#3: Baked Potatoes (With Skin)

Potassium 100g Average Potato (173g)
535mg (15% DV) 926mg (26% DV)

Warning: Potatoes are high in simple carbohydrates and not recommended for people with diabetes. Sweet potatoes are actually better for regulation blood sugar, an average baked sweet potato with skin (114g) provides 542mg (15% DV) of potassium. Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#4: Dried Apricots

Potassium 100g 1/2 cup (65g)
1162mg (33% DV) 755mg (22% DV)

Other Dried Fruits High in Potassium (%DV per 1/2 cup): Peaches (22% DV), Prunes (20% DV), Raisins (18% DV).
Warning: Dried fruits are high in sugar. Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#5: Baked Acorn Squash

Potassium 100g 1 cup cubed (205g)
437mg (12% DV) 899mg (26% DV)

Other Squash High in Potassium (%DV per cup baked): Hubbard (21%), Butternut (17% DV), Zucchini (14% DV), Average Winter Squash (10% DV). Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#6: Yogurt (Plain, Skim/Non-Fat)

Potassium 100g 1 cup (245g)
255mg (7% DV) 625mg (18% DV)

Other Yogurt High in Potassium (%DV per cup): Whole-Fat (11% DV), Chocolate Yogurt (24% DV). Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#7: Fish (Salmon)

Potassium 100g 1 3oz fillet (85g)
628mg (18% DV) 534mg (15% DV)

Other Fish High in Potassium (%DV per 3oz fillet (85g)): Pompano (15% DV), Lingcod (14% DV), Halibut (13% DV), Yellowfin Tuna (13% DV), Anchovies (12% DV), Mackerel (10% DV), Herring (10% DV) and most other fish at an average of 10% DV. Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#8: Avocados

Potassium 100g Average Avocado (201g) 1/2 Cup Pureed (115)
485mg (14% DV) 975mg (28% DV) 558mg (16% DV)

An average avocado provides 322 calories, half a cup purred contains 184 calories. Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#9: Mushrooms (White)

Potassium 100g 1 cup sliced (108g)
396mg (11% DV) 428mg (12% DV)

1 cup cooked sliced white mushrooms contain 28 calories.
Other mushrooms high in potassium (%DV per cup sliced): Portabella (9% DV), Brown or Crimini (9% DV), Enoki (7% DV), Shiitake (5% DV), Maitake (4%



The Top 10 High Potassium Foods by Nutrient Density (Potassium per Gram)

#1: Dried Herbs (Parsley, Chervil, Corriander, Basil, Dill) 4740mg (135% DV) per 100 grams 95mg (3% DV) per tablespoon (2 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dried Herbs
#2: Sun-Dried Tomatoes 3427mg (98% DV) per 100 grams 69mg (2% DV) per piece (2 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Sun Dried Tomatoes
#3: Cocoa Powder and Dark Chocolate 2509mg (72% DV) per 100 grams 125mg (4% DV) per tablespoon (5 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Cocoa Powder
#4: Whey Powder 2289mg (65% DV) per 100 grams 69mg (2% DV) per tablespoon (3 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Whey Powder
#5: Paprika and Chili Powder 2280mg (65% DV) per 100 grams 160mg (5% DV) per tablespoon (7 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Paprika and Chili Powder
#6: Yeast Extract Spread (Marmite) 2100mg (60% DV) per 100 grams 126mg (4% DV) per teaspoon (6 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Yeast Extract Spread (Marmite)
#7: Rice Bran 1485mg (42% DV) per 100 grams 1752mg (50% DV) per cup (118 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Rice Bran
#8: Molasses 1464mg (42% DV) per 100 grams 293mg (8% DV) per tablespoon (20 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Molasses
#9: Dry Roasted Soybeans 1364mg (39% DV) per 100 grams 2346mg (67% DV) per cup (172 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dry Roasted Soybeans
#10: Dry Seaweed (Spirulina) 1363mg (39% DV) per 100 grams 95mg (3% DV) per tablespoon (7 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dry Seaweed (Spirulina)


Other Potassium Rich Foods

Pistachios 1007mg (29% DV) per 100 gram serving 1239mg (35% DV) per cup (123 grams) 282mg (8% DV) per ounce (49 nuts or 28g) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Pistachios
Chestnuts 592mg (17% DV) per 100 gram serving 847mg (24% DV) per cup (143 grams) 166mg (5% DV) per ounce (3 nuts or 28g) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Chestnuts
Almonds 705mg (20% DV) per 100 gram serving 1008mg (29% DV) per cup (143 grams) 197mg (6% DV) per ounce (23 nuts or 28g) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Almonds
Cashews 565mg (16% DV) per 100 gram serving 774mg (22% DV) per cup (137 grams) 158mg (5% DV) per ounce (28g) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Cashews
Walnuts 441mg (13% DV) per 100 gram serving 441mg (13% DV) per cup halves (100 grams) 123mg (4% DV) per ounce (14 halves or 28g) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Walnuts
Squash and Pumpkin Seeds 919mg (26% DV) per 100 gram serving 588mg (17% DV) per cup (64 grams) 257mg (7% DV) per ounce (85 seeds or 28g) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Squash and Pumpkin Seeds
Sunflower Seeds 850mg (24% DV) per 100 gram serving 1088mg (31% DV) per cup hulled (128 grams) 238mg (7% DV) per ounce (85 seeds or 28g) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Sunflower Seeds
Watermelon Seeds 648mg (19% DV) per 100 gram serving 700mg (20% DV) per cup (108 grams) 181mg (5% DV) per ounce (28 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dried Watermelon Seeds
Coconut Water (Juice) 250mg (7% DV) per 100 gram serving 600mg (17% DV) in a cup (240 grams) 515mg (15% DV) per coconut (206 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Coconut Water (Juice)
Orange Juice 200mg (6% DV) per 100 gram serving 496mg (14% DV) in a cup (248 grams) 172mg (5% DV) in the juice of one orange (86 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Orange Juice
Brussels Sprouts (Raw) 389mg (11% DV) per 100 gram serving 342mg (10% DV) per cup (88 grams) 74mg (2% DV) per brussel sprout (19 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Brussels Sprouts
Palm Hearts 177mg (5% DV) per 100 gram serving 258mg (26% DV) per cup (146 grams) 58mg (2% DV) per piece (33 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Canned Palm Hearts
Clams 628mg (18% DV) per 100 gram serving 534mg (15% DV) per 3 ounce serving (85 grams) 1.2g (34% DV) in 20 small clams (190 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Cooked Clams
Whelk 694mg (20% DV) per 100 gram serving 350mg (15% DV) per 3oz serving (85 grams) 117mg (5% DV) per ounce (28 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Whelk
Dried Figs 680mg (19% DV) per 100 gram serving 1g (29% DV) per cup (149 grams) 54mg (2% DV) in a single fig (8 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dried Figs
Dates 696mg (20% DV) per 100 gram serving 167mg (5% DV) in a single large date (24 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dates (Medjool)

To find even more high potassium foods, use the nutrient ranking tool.

Health Benefits of Potassium

  • Osteoporosis Protection – Several studies have found a relation between increased bone density and increased intake of dietary potassium. These studies were true even for post menopausal women and older men.2-4
  • Reduced Risk of Stroke – Several observational studies have found that those with high potassium levels experience a lower risk of stroke. The health benefits are likely through reduction of blood pressure combined with a diet high in fruits and vegetables.5-9
  • Alleviation of High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) – Studies show that a diet high in potassium, especially potassium from fruits and vegetables, lowers blood pressure. This is especially true if the increase in potassium foods is not accompanied by an increase in high sodium foods. 10-12

People at Risk of a Potassium Deficiency

  • Alcoholics
  • People taking Diuretics – Especially thiazide or furosemide
  • Long distance athletes – People who exercise over long distances lose electrolytes via sweat and need to replenish their sodium, potassium, magnesium, and phosphorus levels.
  • Dehydration – People who consume excess alcohol, or suffer severe vomiting/diarrhea, or can be otherwise dehydrated need to replenish their sodium, potassium, magnesium, and phosphorus levels.
  • Anorexics or bulimics
  • People with a magnesium deficiency
  • People taking Certain Medications13,14
    • Beta-adrenergic agonists – Epinephrine
    • Decongestants – Pseudoephedrine, phenylpropanolamine
    • Bronchodilators – Albuterol, terbutaline, pirbuterol, isoetharine, fenoterol, ephedrine, isoproterenol, metaproterenol, theophylline
    • Tocolytic (labor suppressing) agents – Ritodrine, nylidrin
    • Diuretics – Acetazolamide, thiazides, chlorthalidone, indapamide, metolazone, quinethazone, bumetanide, ethacrynic acid, furosemide, torsemide
    • Mineralocorticoids – Fludrocortisone
    • Substances with mineralocorticoid effects – Licorice, carbenoxolone, gossypol
    • High-dose glucocorticoids
    • High-dose antibiotics – Penicillin, nafcillin, carbenicillin
    • Other – Caffeine, phenolphthalein, sodium polystyrene sulfonate

Read more at http://www.healthaliciousness.com/articles/food-sources-of-potassium.php#YJLLRDXrmsrWcmVy.99